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  • Outermost Coffin, spring 1926
    Harry Burton (English, 1879–1940)
    The Egyptian Expedition of The Metropolitan Museum of Art
    Gelatin silver print, 6 1/2 x 8 5/8 in. (16.5 x 21.9 cm) (TAA 364)

  • Unbroken Seal on the Third Shrine, January 1924
    Harry Burton (English, 1879–1940)
    The Egyptian Expedition of The Metropolitan Museum of Art
    Gelatin silver print, 9 x 6 in. (22.9 x 15.2 cm) (TAA 622)
  • Howard Carter Looking through the Open Doors of Tutankhamun’s Second Shrine, January 1924
    Harry Burton (English, 1879–1940)
    The Egyptian Expedition of The Metropolitan Museum of Art
    Gelatin silver print,  6 5/8 x 9 in. (16.9 x 22.9 cm)

  •  Outer coffin of Queen Merytamun (M10C 119). Photograph by Harry Burton, 1929. Archives of the Egyptian Expedition, Department of Egyptian Art. metmuseum.org

.

Description from The Metropolitan Museum of Art:  “In 1914, Harry Burton was hired as a member of the graphic section, initially to photograph tomb interiors and later to record the work of the Museum’s excavation team. Burton rapidly gained a reputation as the finest archaeological photographer of his time. Thus, when Howard Carter discovered Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922, he promptly asked the Metropolitan for the loan of Burton’s services. For the next eight years, Burton divided his time between Tutankhamun and the Egyptian Expedition.


Between 1914 and his death in 1940, Burton produced and printed more than 14,000 glass negatives; the majority of those negatives and prints are in the archives of the Department of Egyptian Art. To Egyptologists, Harry Burton’s photographs are among the great treasures of the department. For the art historian, he has left a complete photographic record of dozens of decorated tombs as they were preserved in the early twentieth century. For the archaeologist and the historian, he has left an invaluable record of the Museum’s excavations. Since archaeology is a process of removal and destruction, Burton’s stage-by-stage documentation of work in progress allows us to re-create the context of objects that are now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo, and in New York. Burton’s photographs of the tomb of Tutankhamun, much better known than his work for the Museum, give the same thorough record of each new discovery within that tomb.”  via:  metmuseum.org

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