Love by bermek HERE

Love by bermek HERE


I Used to be You 

Photographs and text by  Kyoko Hamada  HERE (via:lensculture)


From the photographer:  ”If I met Kikuchiyo-san, I might just smile at her and be quiet for a while. She probably wouldn’t say much either; she might just nod and smile if I spoke about anything at all. Or, she might ask me to sit with her on a park bench and we would look at the sunset in the quiet stillness.

Kikuchiyo-san is a fictional character. Rather than being in my comfort zone behind the camera, I am the subject facing the lens. The back and forth of Kikuchiyo-san being in her own home and out in the world and the still-lifes which are interspersed throughout bring to mind my tendency to ponder things that are right in front of me, as well as things I will never understand.

When I first tried on her gray wig, the latex make-up, and her clothes, I gazed at the mirror for a long time. My initial reaction was to chuckle, but I started feeling a little uneasy soon after. The wrinkled face staring back at me resembled my own with thirty-plus years added to it. When I smiled, she smiled back at me. When I pouted, she pouted too. It was the first time I had met her, but she was simultaneously someone I already knew quite well and someone I knew nothing about.

Unlike the feeling evoked by the painting in Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray, looking at Kikuchiyo-san in the mirror caused me to feel a mixture of humility, humor and a sense of tender familiarity.

I’m not sure when my interest in aging started, though I can think of several reasons why it is now on my mind. Small losses like my favorite corner cafe being replaced by a chain drug store, and finding the first few strands of gray in my hair. Or, bigger losses like death of my father and the disaster in Japan a year ago in March. In June, Kikuchiyo-san will have been with me through four seasons; a reminder that time and life are always moving.

I have gotten used to dressing up as Kikuchiyo-san because it has been a year since I started photographing her. But I still feel uneasy imagining the one sentence Kikuchiyo-san could utter to me if I met her in a crowded train station or during a walk in the park: “I used to be you.”

— Kyoko Hamada  
HERE


Artemis:  This is well done.  It’s touching.  Very sweet.   :)   


The Dance of the Winds - scanned from an old magazine (via: L. Michaud on Pinterest)

Artemis:  Warren B. Davis is an American painter and illustrator, 1865–1928.

The Dance of the Winds - scanned from an old magazine (via: L. Michaud on Pinterest)

Artemis:  Warren B. Davis is an American painter and illustrator, 1865–1928.

Warren B Davis

Women Dancing (Dance of the Forest Nymphs)
Warren B. Davis 

Bio from 1st Dibs “Warren B. Davis (1865–1928) is an American painter and illustrator known for his dry-point etchings and tempera paintings of idealized young women. Davis studied at the Art Students League in New York and is often compared to similar artists of his time, N.C. Wyeth and Maxfield Parrish.
His commercial work include illustrations for Vanity Fair, Life Magazine, and The Ladies World.
Now his work can be seen at The Richter Gallery in Bellows Falls, Vermont and at the Cleveland Museum of Art”

Women Dancing (Dance of the Forest Nymphs)

Warren B. Davis


Bio from 1st Dibs “Warren B. Davis (1865–1928) is an American painter and illustrator known for his dry-point etchings and tempera paintings of idealized young women. Davis studied at the Art Students League in New York and is often compared to similar artists of his time, N.C. Wyeth and Maxfield Parrish.

His commercial work include illustrations for Vanity Fair, Life Magazine, and The Ladies World.

Now his work can be seen at The Richter Gallery in Bellows Falls, Vermont and at the Cleveland Museum of Art”


Nymph of the Glen
Warren B Davis  (1865 - 1928)

Nymph of the Glen

Warren B Davis  (1865 - 1928)


Warren B. Davis (American, 1865–1928)Where the Brook Winds, n.d.Oil on cardboard10 × 12 in. (25.4 × 30.48 cm)Layton Art Collection, Gift of Irving H. Reynolds L1934.1Photo credit: John R. Glembin, Milwaukee Art Museum

Warren B. Davis (American, 1865–1928)
Where the Brook Winds, n.d.
Oil on cardboard
10 × 12 in. (25.4 × 30.48 cm)
Layton Art Collection, Gift of Irving H. Reynolds L1934.1
Photo credit: John R. Glembin, Milwaukee Art Museum






Birds and Flowers of the Twelve Months,  Smithsonian Museum
Sakai Hoitsu


Birds and Flowers of the Twelve Months,  Smithsonian Museum

Sakai Hoitsu


blackbirdspots:
..Ophelia..
Photographer on tumblr: blackbirdspots  HERE
See high-res. 

blackbirdspots:

..Ophelia..

Photographer on tumblr: blackbirdspots  HERE

See high-res. 


METAMORPHOSIS
Szymon Kobusiński   HERE



From the Photographer:  ”Metamorphosis is a project directed and photographed by Szymon Kobusiński. The author is a member of Nikon Film Festival jury and the project he created, is specially dedicated for the 1st Polish edition of the festival. The short video form tells about “the birth” of the new NFF project. It also reveals the fact that photographers more and more often reach for the tools that allow them to liven up the photography. It means not only new kinds of cameras and lenses but also new types of lamps.
 
The project binds photographic and film techniques together. The shooting took two days. The first day was reserved for underwater shooting featuring an actress. The second day was for a FX work in a studio. In both cases the author used two Nikon D4 cameras, and the light was based on a Broncolor illuminating system. A Broncolor HMI 800 lamp set on a PARA 220 reflector was the main source of light. Additional light sources consisted of 3-4 Pulso G lamps, accompanied by a modeling incandescent light. Almost all the lightning equipment was suspended above the water surface. In some shots the author used additional underwater lamps called Ikelite, and put a Broncolor Softlight lamp on one of them.
 
The FX photo shots above and under the water surface were illuminated with the HMI 800 lamps with one PARA 88 reflector and a number of different reflector boards and cutters. The stop-motion sequences were shot with Nikon D4 and Scoro A4S generator (11 stops/sec).”


The Wave by Christopher R. W. Nevinson, 1917

Artemis: Thank you, sirobtep and androphilia.  Like this.   

The Wave by Christopher R. W. Nevinson, 1917


Artemis: Thank you, sirobtep and androphilia.  Like this.   





Mary Magdalene in the Cave, 1868
Hugues Merle

From Wiki:  ”Hugues Merle (1823–1881) was a French painter who mostly depicted sentimental or moral subjects. He has often been compared with William-Adolphe Bouguereau.

Hugues Merle was born in 1823 in Saint Martin. He studied painting with Léon Cogniet. Merle started exhibiting at the Salon (Paris) in 1847. He received second class prices in 1861 and 1863. In 1866 he was made Chevalier of the Legion of Honor. Hugues Merle became a friend of Paul Durand-Ruel’s in the early 1860s. Durand-Ruel had started buying paintings by Merle in 1862 and introduced Merle to William-Adolphe Bouguereau.  Merle would then often be compared to Bouguereau and even “became a considerable rival of Bouguereau in subject and treatment”.  In the mid-1860s, Merle painted several portraits of Paul Durand-Ruel, his wife, and their son, John. Hugues Merle died in 1881 in Paris. His son, Georges Merle, was also a painter.”  


Mary Magdalene in the Cave, 1868

Hugues Merle


From Wiki:  ”Hugues Merle (1823–1881) was a French painter who mostly depicted sentimental or moral subjects. He has often been compared with William-Adolphe Bouguereau.

Hugues Merle was born in 1823 in Saint Martin. He studied painting with Léon Cogniet. Merle started exhibiting at the Salon (Paris) in 1847. He received second class prices in 1861 and 1863. In 1866 he was made Chevalier of the Legion of Honor. Hugues Merle became a friend of Paul Durand-Ruel’s in the early 1860s. Durand-Ruel had started buying paintings by Merle in 1862 and introduced Merle to William-Adolphe Bouguereau.  Merle would then often be compared to Bouguereau and even “became a considerable rival of Bouguereau in subject and treatment”.  In the mid-1860s, Merle painted several portraits of Paul Durand-Ruel, his wife, and their son, John. Hugues Merle died in 1881 in Paris. His son, Georges Merle, was also a painter.”  


Bill Bate  HERE and HERE


Who, if I cried out, would hear me among the angels hierarchies?
“

Rainer Maria Rilke (via journalofanobody)


 Asahi (朝日, 旭, or あさひ) means “morning sun” in Japanese  
Compound of 朝 (asa, “morning”) +‎ 日 (hi, “sun”) (ryuurui.wetcanvas.com)


Asahi (朝日, 旭, or あさひ) means “morning sun” in Japanese 

Compound of 朝 (asa, “morning”) +‎ 日 (hi, “sun”) (ryuurui.wetcanvas.com)