Anthologia, unique sun prints 

Øyvind Hjelmen (via: Lens Culture)


Artist Statement: "Anthologia, in Greek, means literally “flower-gathering” for a garland — or a bouquet of flowers.

"The series consists of prints of plants and flowers from my garden. 

"These prints are made by placing plants directly on photographic paper, and exposing them to sunlight for 3 hours. This produces a negative image of the plant, which bears some resemblance to W. H. Fox Talbot´s paper negatives from the 1820s. The paper is then placed in developer for 10 – 15 seconds, to make a positive image.

"Each silver gelatin print is unique, approximately 50 x 60 cm." (via: lensculture)


Folio from an unidentified text. Illuminated medallion with two ornamental borders. 13th-14th century
Ink, opaque watercolor and gold on paper H: 33.8 W: 24.6 cm  Iran  F1933.3,  Smithsonian  Museum 

Folio from an unidentified text. Illuminated medallion with two ornamental borders. 13th-14th century

Ink, opaque watercolor and gold on paper
H: 33.8 W: 24.6 cm
Iran

F1933.3,  Smithsonian  Museum 


Marcel Duchamp, 1960

Marcel Duchamp, 1960


Rotorelief no. 5 - Poisson Japonais, 1935,  Detroit Institute of Arts
Marcel Duchamp

Rotorelief no. 5 - Poisson Japonais, 1935,  Detroit Institute of Arts

Marcel Duchamp


Disks Bearing Spirals (Disques avec spirales)1923, Seattle Art Museum
Marcel Duchamp  

Disks Bearing Spirals (Disques avec spirales)1923, Seattle Art Museum

Marcel Duchamp  




There is no end. There is no beginning. There is only the infinite passion of life.

~Federico Fellini, Fellini on Fellini, 1976 

Labyrinth on the portico of the cathedral of San Martino at Lucca,Tuscany, Italy



The Latin inscription:  Hic Quem Creticus Edit. Daedalus Est Laberinthus. De Quo Nullus Vadere. Quivit Qui Fuit  Intus. Ni Theseus Gratis  Adriane. Stamine  Jutus

Description from Wiki:  ”The labyrinth or maze is embedded in the right pier of the portico and is believed to date from the 12th or 13th century. Its importance is that it may well pre-date the famous Chartres maze, yet is of the Chartres pattern that became a standard for mazes.

The rustic incised Latin inscription refers to ancient pagan mythology: “This is the labyrinth built by Dedalus of Crete; all who entered therein were lost, save Theseus, thanks to Ariadne’s thread” (Hic Quem Creticus Edit. Daedalus Est Laberinthus. De Quo Nullus Vadere. Quivit Qui Fuit  Intus. Ni Theseus Gratis  Adriane. Stamine  Jutus”).” Photo: Myrabella / Wikimedia Commons / CC-BY-SA-3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

More about  Lucca Cathedral from wiki:  ”Lucca Cathedral  (Italian: Duomo di Lucca, Cattedrale di San Martino) is a Roman Catholic cathedral dedicated to Saint Martin in Lucca, Italy. It is the seat of the Bishop of Lucca. Construction was begun in 1063 by Bishop Anselm (later Pope Alexander II).

Of the original structure, the great apse with its tall columnar arcades and the fine campanile remain. The nave and transepts of the cathedral were rebuilt in the Gothic style in the 14th century, while the west front was begun in 1204 by Guido Bigarelli of Como, and consists of a vast portico of three magnificent arches, and above them three ranges of open galleries adorned with sculptures.

In the nave a small octagonal temple or chapel shrine contains the most precious relic in Lucca, the Holy Face of Lucca (Italian: Volto Santo di Lucca) or Sacred Countenance. This cedar-wood crucifix and image of Christ, according to the legend, was carved by his contemporary Nicodemus, and miraculously conveyed to Lucca in 782. Christ is clothed in the colobium, a long sleeveless garment. The chapel was built in 1484 by Matteo Civitali, the most famous Luccan sculptor of the early Renaissance.

The tomb of Ilaria del Carretto by Jacopo della Quercia of Siena, the earliest of his extant works was commissioned by her husband, the lord of Lucca, Paolo Guinigi, in 1406.

Additionally the cathedral contains Domenico Ghirlandaio’s Madonna and Child with Saints Peter, Clement, Paul and Sebastian; Federico Zuccari’s Adoration of the Magi, Jacopo Tintoretto’s Last Supper, and finally Fra Bartolomeo’s Madonna and Child (1509).

There is a legend to explain why all the columns of the façade are different. According to the tale, when they were going to decorate it, the inhabitants of Lucca announced a contest for the best column. Every artist made a column, but then the inhabitants of Lucca decided to take them all, without paying the artists and used all the columns.”

Labyrinth on the portico of the cathedral of San Martino at Lucca,Tuscany, Italy



The Latin inscription:  Hic Quem Creticus Edit. Daedalus Est Laberinthus. De Quo Nullus Vadere. Quivit Qui Fuit  Intus. Ni Theseus Gratis  Adriane. Stamine  Jutus


Description from Wiki:  ”The labyrinth or maze is embedded in the right pier of the portico and is believed to date from the 12th or 13th century. Its importance is that it may well pre-date the famous Chartres maze, yet is of the Chartres pattern that became a standard for mazes.

The rustic incised Latin inscription refers to ancient pagan mythology: “This is the labyrinth built by Dedalus of Crete; all who entered therein were lost, save Theseus, thanks to Ariadne’s thread” (Hic Quem Creticus Edit. Daedalus Est Laberinthus. De Quo Nullus Vadere. Quivit Qui Fuit  Intus. Ni Theseus Gratis  Adriane. Stamine  Jutus”).” Photo: Myrabella / Wikimedia Commons / CC-BY-SA-3.0, via Wikimedia Commons


More about  Lucca Cathedral from wiki:  ”Lucca Cathedral  (Italian: Duomo di Lucca, Cattedrale di San Martino) is a Roman Catholic cathedral dedicated to Saint Martin in Lucca, Italy. It is the seat of the Bishop of Lucca. Construction was begun in 1063 by Bishop Anselm (later Pope Alexander II).

Of the original structure, the great apse with its tall columnar arcades and the fine campanile remain. The nave and transepts of the cathedral were rebuilt in the Gothic style in the 14th century, while the west front was begun in 1204 by Guido Bigarelli of Como, and consists of a vast portico of three magnificent arches, and above them three ranges of open galleries adorned with sculptures.

In the nave a small octagonal temple or chapel shrine contains the most precious relic in Lucca, the Holy Face of Lucca (Italian: Volto Santo di Lucca) or Sacred Countenance. This cedar-wood crucifix and image of Christ, according to the legend, was carved by his contemporary Nicodemus, and miraculously conveyed to Lucca in 782. Christ is clothed in the colobium, a long sleeveless garment. The chapel was built in 1484 by Matteo Civitali, the most famous Luccan sculptor of the early Renaissance.

The tomb of Ilaria del Carretto by Jacopo della Quercia of Siena, the earliest of his extant works was commissioned by her husband, the lord of Lucca, Paolo Guinigi, in 1406.

Additionally the cathedral contains Domenico Ghirlandaio’s Madonna and Child with Saints Peter, Clement, Paul and Sebastian; Federico Zuccari’s Adoration of the Magi, Jacopo Tintoretto’s Last Supper, and finally Fra Bartolomeo’s Madonna and Child (1509).

There is a legend to explain why all the columns of the façade are different. According to the tale, when they were going to decorate it, the inhabitants of Lucca announced a contest for the best column. Every artist made a column, but then the inhabitants of Lucca decided to take them all, without paying the artists and used all the columns.”


fathom-the-universe:
The Physics of Music
These patterns are made with nothing but sound. They are called Chladni patterns, after the German physicist Ernst Chladni (1756–1827) who used his violin bow to vibrate a metal plate with sand on it. A pattern appears in the sand when a surface is made to vibrate at certain resonances. A plate or membrane vibrating at resonance is divided into regions vibrating in opposite directions, bounded by lines of zero vibration called nodal lines. The sand is moved around the plate and collects at the nodes on the plate. The patterns that form are highly symmetrical and beautiful.
Fathom the Universe

Image: Chladni array

fathom-the-universe:

The Physics of Music

These patterns are made with nothing but sound. They are called Chladni patterns, after the German physicist Ernst Chladni (1756–1827) who used his violin bow to vibrate a metal plate with sand on it. A pattern appears in the sand when a surface is made to vibrate at certain resonances. A plate or membrane vibrating at resonance is divided into regions vibrating in opposite directions, bounded by lines of zero vibration called nodal lines. The sand is moved around the plate and collects at the nodes on the plate. The patterns that form are highly symmetrical and beautiful.


Fathom the Universe

Image: Chladni array

artemisvoice:

If you have to ask, you’ll never know.


~Louis Armstrong - when asked to define the rhythmic concept of “swing”, quoted in Jazz 101 by John F. Szwed


August 4, 1901 – July 6, 1971

Satchmo :)


artemisvoice

Miles Davis

Glen Craig (via: mochamanstyle.com)



The mind was dreaming. The world was its dream.

~Jorge Luis Borges
  Image via: lanochedemaine.files.com , Jorge Luis Borges, Paris, 1979,  Photograph by Ulf Andersen - Getty Images
 Artemis: Thank you to patriciadamiano for the photographer and other details. :)


The mind was dreaming. The world was its dream.


~Jorge Luis Borges

  Image via: lanochedemaine.files.com , Jorge Luis Borges, Paris, 1979,  Photograph by Ulf Andersen - Getty Images



Artemis: Thank you to patriciadamiano for the photographer and other details. :)

Alberich Mathews (via: fluidr.com and pinterest)


Claude Debussy - Reflets dans l’eau - Reflections in the Water (via: PoesiasPreferidas | youtube)


(via: AdrianaCioci | TommasoIorio on twitter) 

Artemis: Sunday

(via: AdrianaCioci | TommasoIorio on twitter) 


Artemis: Sunday


Untitled, date unknown

Ferdinando Scianna  (via: lofficielitalia.com)
Untitled, date unknown
Ferdinando Scianna  (via: lofficielitalia.com)