anarchoaesthete:(via rainysanctuary)

 
THE YOUNG SYRIAN How beautiful is the Princess Salome to-night!
THE PAGE OF HERODIAS Look at the moon. How strange the moon seems! She is like a woman rising from a tomb. She is like a dead woman. One might fancy she was looking for dead things.
THE YOUNG SYRIAN She has a strange look. She is like a little princess who wears a yellow veil, and whose feet are of silver. She is like a princess who has little white doves for feet. One might fancy she was dancing.
Artemis: Love this.  Thank you, anarchoaesthete.  :)
whatcolorisyoursky:(via kassandracreations)
akindofwonderful:

(by ·Yanire·)
Artemis:  :)

Artemis:  :)

nends:

Knud Jeppesen: Der Kopenhagener Chansonnier, musical medieval manuscript from the Royal Library of Copenhagen

nends:

Knud Jeppesen: Der Kopenhagener Chansonnier, musical medieval manuscript from the Royal Library of Copenhagen

dasbettinflammensehen:

♡
 
Artemis: Thank you, dasbettinflammensehen.  :)

dasbettinflammensehen:

 

Artemis: Thank you, dasbettinflammensehen.  :)

Do not as some ungracious pastors do, Show me the steep and thorny way to heaven, Whiles, like a puff’d and reckless libertine, Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads And recks not his own rede.
Hamlet, Ophelia to Laertes  Act I, Scene 3
Shakespeare

Do not as some ungracious pastors do,
Show me the steep and thorny way to heaven,
Whiles, like a puff’d and reckless libertine,
Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads
And recks not his own rede.

Hamlet, Ophelia to Laertes  Act I, Scene 3

Shakespeare

among-the-roses:yasmeen2:beautifulwomeninphotography
quotetheraven:unrealitycircle:anniastyle:(via bonparisien)
 Musee D`Orsay/Paris
msambivalence:calamity-physics:teachingliteracy:womenreading: (via thingssheloves)
Artemis:  :D

Sade - Pearls (Live)

ilibertario:

Jack Kerouac.

ilibertario:

Jack Kerouac.

I crossed the street to walk in the sunshine.
Elizabeth Gilbert (Eat, Pray, Love)
Zodiac from the Temple of Dendera
Sandstone: length 2.55 m, width 2.53 m
Musée du Louvre Département des Antiquités égyptiennes 
 
The sculptured Dendera zodiac (or Denderah zodiac) is a widely known Egyptian bas-relief from the ceiling of the pronaos (or portico) of a chapel dedicated to Osiris in the Hathor temple at Dendera, containing images of Taurus (the bull) and the Libra (the scales). This chapel was begun in the late Ptolemaic period; its pronaos was added by the emperor Tiberius. This led Jean-François Champollion to date the relief correctly to the Greco-Roman period, but most of his contemporaries believed it to be of the New Kingdom. The now-accepted date for the relief is 50 BC, since it shows the stars and planets in the positions they would have been seen at that date. The relief, which John H. Rogers characterised as “the only complete map that we have of an ancient sky”,has been conjectured to represent the basis on which later astronomy systems were based.It is now on display at the Musée du Louvre, Paris.
The zodiac is a planisphere or map of the stars on a plane projection, showing the 12 constellations of the zodiacal band forming 36 decans of ten days each, and the planets. These decans are groups of first-magnitude stars. These were used in the ancient Egyptian calendar, which was based on lunar cycles of around 30 days and on the heliacal rising of the star Sothis (Sirius).
Its representation of the zodiac in circular form is unique in ancient Egyptian art.More typical are the rectangular zodiacs which decorate the same temple’s pronaos.
The celestial arch is represented by a disc held up by four pillars of the sky in the form of women, between which are inserted falcon-headed spirits. On the first ring, 36 spirits symbolize the 360 days of the Egyptian year.
On an inner circle, one finds constellations, showing the signs of the zodiac. Some of these are represented in the same Greco-Roman iconographic forms as their familiar counterparts (e.g. the Ram, Taurus, Scorpio, and Capricorn, albeit most in odd orientations in comparison to the conventions of ancient Greece and later Arabic-Western developments), whilst others are shown in a more Egyptian form: Aquarius is represented as the flood god Hapy, holding two vases which gush water. Rogers noted the similarities of unfamiliar iconology with the three surviving tablets of a “Seleucid zodiac" and both relating to kudurru, “boundary-stone” representations: in short, Rogers sees the Dendera zodiac as “a complete copy of the Mesopotamian zodiac.  Read more:  Dendera zodiac - Wikipedia

Zodiac from the Temple of Dendera

Sandstone: length 2.55 m, width 2.53 m

Musée du Louvre Département des Antiquités égyptiennes

 

The sculptured Dendera zodiac (or Denderah zodiac) is a widely known Egyptian bas-relief from the ceiling of the pronaos (or portico) of a chapel dedicated to Osiris in the Hathor temple at Dendera, containing images of Taurus (the bull) and the Libra (the scales). This chapel was begun in the late Ptolemaic period; its pronaos was added by the emperor Tiberius. This led Jean-François Champollion to date the relief correctly to the Greco-Roman period, but most of his contemporaries believed it to be of the New Kingdom. The now-accepted date for the relief is 50 BC, since it shows the stars and planets in the positions they would have been seen at that date. The relief, which John H. Rogers characterised as “the only complete map that we have of an ancient sky”,has been conjectured to represent the basis on which later astronomy systems were based.It is now on display at the Musée du Louvre, Paris.

The zodiac is a planisphere or map of the stars on a plane projection, showing the 12 constellations of the zodiacal band forming 36 decans of ten days each, and the planets. These decans are groups of first-magnitude stars. These were used in the ancient Egyptian calendar, which was based on lunar cycles of around 30 days and on the heliacal rising of the star Sothis (Sirius).

Its representation of the zodiac in circular form is unique in ancient Egyptian art.More typical are the rectangular zodiacs which decorate the same temple’s pronaos.

The celestial arch is represented by a disc held up by four pillars of the sky in the form of women, between which are inserted falcon-headed spirits. On the first ring, 36 spirits symbolize the 360 days of the Egyptian year.

On an inner circle, one finds constellations, showing the signs of the zodiac. Some of these are represented in the same Greco-Roman iconographic forms as their familiar counterparts (e.g. the Ram, Taurus, Scorpio, and Capricorn, albeit most in odd orientations in comparison to the conventions of ancient Greece and later Arabic-Western developments), whilst others are shown in a more Egyptian form: Aquarius is represented as the flood god Hapy, holding two vases which gush water. Rogers noted the similarities of unfamiliar iconology with the three surviving tablets of a “Seleucid zodiac" and both relating to kudurru, “boundary-stone” representations: in short, Rogers sees the Dendera zodiac as “a complete copy of the Mesopotamian zodiac.  Read more:  Dendera zodiac - Wikipedia

French engineers made this drawing of the Dendera zodiac still in place on the temple ceiling, before it was blasted out and carted off to Paris. It was published in 1809 in the Description de l’Egypte, complete with a goddess and panels of hieroglyphs that did not appear in Denon’s sketch—nor, ultimately, in the Louvre.

French engineers made this drawing of the Dendera zodiac still in place on the temple ceiling, before it was blasted out and carted off to Paris. It was published in 1809 in the Description de l’Egypte, complete with a goddess and panels of hieroglyphs that did not appear in Denon’s sketch—nor, ultimately, in the Louvre.