I think if you search for Glass Harmonica in my archive I posted a couple of pieces- it is the most unlikely instrument- ethereal and beautiful- so aproporiate for your site- x

I didn’t see this until after I posted. I’ll search for your post as well. Thank you, lushlight… for the help and the kind words.  :)  


We’ve known about the ‘wet-finger-around-the-wine-glass’ idea since Renaissance times—one of the first people to write about that phenomenon was Galileo. Sets of water-tuned glasses on which you can play tunes were popularized in England by Pockridge and Gluck in the early 1700’s.
In 1761 Benjamin Franklin was in London representing the Pennsylvania Legislature to Parliament. Franklin was very interested in music: he was a capable amateur musician, attended concerts regularly, and even wrote a string quartet! One of the concerts Franklin attended was by Deleval, a colleague of his in the Royal Academy, who performed on a set of water tuned wineglasses patterned after Pockridge’s instrument. Franklin was enchanted, and determined to invent and build ‘a more convenient’ arrangement. Franklin’s new invention premiered in early 1762, played by Marianne Davies—a well known musician in London who learned to play Franklin’s new invention. Initially Franklin named it the ‘glassychord’, but soon settled on ‘armonica’ as the name for his new invention—after the Italian word for harmony “armonia”. Apparently Franklin built a second instrument for Ms. Davies, as she toured Europe with hers, while Franklin returned to Philadelphia with his… read more: http://www.glassarmonica.com/
This is wonderful, dualkelly. Thank you. :)

We’ve known about the ‘wet-finger-around-the-wine-glass’ idea since Renaissance times—one of the first people to write about that phenomenon was Galileo. Sets of water-tuned glasses on which you can play tunes were popularized in England by Pockridge and Gluck in the early 1700’s.

In 1761 Benjamin Franklin was in London representing the Pennsylvania Legislature to Parliament. Franklin was very interested in music: he was a capable amateur musician, attended concerts regularly, and even wrote a string quartet! One of the concerts Franklin attended was by Deleval, a colleague of his in the Royal Academy, who performed on a set of water tuned wineglasses patterned after Pockridge’s instrument. Franklin was enchanted, and determined to invent and build ‘a more convenient’ arrangement. Franklin’s new invention premiered in early 1762, played by Marianne Davies—a well known musician in London who learned to play Franklin’s new invention. Initially Franklin named it the ‘glassychord’, but soon settled on ‘armonica’ as the name for his new invention—after the Italian word for harmony “armonia”. Apparently Franklin built a second instrument for Ms. Davies, as she toured Europe with hers, while Franklin returned to Philadelphia with his… read more: http://www.glassarmonica.com/

This is wonderful, dualkelly. Thank you. :)

I think if you search for Glass Harmonica in my archive I posted a couple of pieces- it is the most unlikely instrument- ethereal and beautiful- so aproporiate for your site- x

I didn’t see this until after I posted. I’ll search for your post as well. Thank you, lushlight… for the help and the kind words.  :)  

now you need one on the glass armonica that Benjamin Franklin created and Mozart composed a piece on :)
http://www.glassarmonica.com/

Thank you.  I really like this.  :)  It’s good to see you.  :)

now you need one on the glass armonica that Benjamin Franklin created and Mozart composed a piece on :)
http://www.glassarmonica.com/

Thank you.  I really like this.  :)  It’s good to see you.  :)

There is another world, and it is in this one.
“
Paul Éluard (via invisiblestories, aperfectcommotion)
Grand piano, ca. 1820Joseph Böhm (Austrian, 1786–ca. 1850)Vienna, AustriaWood and various materials
L. 88 in. (223.4 cm), W. 49 3/4 in. (126.4 cm), H. 37 in. (93.7 cm)Purchase, Rogers Fund; Mr. and Mrs. Thatcher M. Brown III, Mr. and Mrs. Philip J. Hess, Carroll Music Instrument Service Corp., The New York Flute Club Inc. and Piano Technicians; Guild Gifts; Gifts of Mrs. Etta M Helmer, Alice Getty, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Wellman, Mr. and Mrs. Peter M. F. Sichel, Craig E. Steese, Hilda Katz, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur A. Travis, and The Crosby Brown Collection of Musical Instruments, by exchange; and funds from various donors, 1982 (1982.138)

Like the earlier Viennese makers, the builder of this sumptuous grand piano was also a member of Vienna’s civic keyboard-maker’s association. Napoleon’s second wife, Marie Louise, is believed to have owned this piano while she was grand duchess of Parma. Exotic elm veneer is enriched by mercury-gilt mounts depicting grapevines, acanthuses, and Psyche at a tripod brazier. Imperial eagles crown the legs and nameplate. The instrument has a compass of six octaves (seventy-three keys) and is triple-strung throughout. metmuseum

Grand piano, ca. 1820
Joseph Böhm (Austrian, 1786–ca. 1850)
Vienna, Austria
Wood and various materials

L. 88 in. (223.4 cm), W. 49 3/4 in. (126.4 cm), H. 37 in. (93.7 cm)
Purchase, Rogers Fund; Mr. and Mrs. Thatcher M. Brown III, Mr. and Mrs. Philip J. Hess, Carroll Music Instrument Service Corp., The New York Flute Club Inc. and Piano Technicians; Guild Gifts; Gifts of Mrs. Etta M Helmer, Alice Getty, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Wellman, Mr. and Mrs. Peter M. F. Sichel, Craig E. Steese, Hilda Katz, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur A. Travis, and The Crosby Brown Collection of Musical Instruments, by exchange; and funds from various donors, 1982 (1982.138)

Like the earlier Viennese makers, the builder of this sumptuous grand piano was also a member of Vienna’s civic keyboard-maker’s association. Napoleon’s second wife, Marie Louise, is believed to have owned this piano while she was grand duchess of Parma. Exotic elm veneer is enriched by mercury-gilt mounts depicting grapevines, acanthuses, and Psyche at a tripod brazier. Imperial eagles crown the legs and nameplate. The instrument has a compass of six octaves (seventy-three keys) and is triple-strung throughout. metmuseum



Claviorganum, 1598Made by Laurentium HauslaibNuremberg, GermanyWood and various materials
L. 26 in. (66 cm)The Crosby Brown Collection of Musical Instruments, 1889 (89.4.1191)

This tiny instrument incorporates an organ and a virginal built into an ebony tabletop chest of drawers. The lower keyboard manual is for the organ, and levers at the left of the keyboard serve as stops. A pair of bellows is concealed beneath the top of the chest; two ranks of flue pipes and a regal (reed) stop are arranged behind the drawers in the back. The upper keyboard belongs to a removable octave virginal. The instrument is tuned to approximately A=445. Above the keyboards is a small door with a lock and two carved columns flanking a brass relief panel depicting the Deposition from the Cross. The instrument was constructed by Laurentium Hauslaib during the time that he served at the court of Frederick IV, elector of the Palatinate, and was probably intended for domestic use. metmuseum

Claviorganum, 1598
Made by Laurentium Hauslaib
Nuremberg, Germany
Wood and various materials

L. 26 in. (66 cm)
The Crosby Brown Collection of Musical Instruments, 1889 (89.4.1191)

This tiny instrument incorporates an organ and a virginal built into an ebony tabletop chest of drawers. The lower keyboard manual is for the organ, and levers at the left of the keyboard serve as stops. A pair of bellows is concealed beneath the top of the chest; two ranks of flue pipes and a regal (reed) stop are arranged behind the drawers in the back. The upper keyboard belongs to a removable octave virginal. The instrument is tuned to approximately A=445. Above the keyboards is a small door with a lock and two carved columns flanking a brass relief panel depicting the Deposition from the Cross. The instrument was constructed by Laurentium Hauslaib during the time that he served at the court of Frederick IV, elector of the Palatinate, and was probably intended for domestic use. metmuseum



Clavichord, 1763Christian KintzingNeuwied, GermanyWood
W. 54 3/8 in. (138.2 cm), L. perpendicular to keyboard 18 1/4 in. (46.3 cm), H. of case 4 in. (10.1 cm)Purchase, The Crosby Brown Collection of Musical Instruments, by exchange, Rogers Fund, The Barrington Foundation, Inc. Gift, and Gifts of George Bashlow, Mr. and Mrs. Jason Berger, in honor of Angna Enters, Risa and David Bernstein, Carroll C. Beverly, and Garry S. Bratman, Miss Alice Getty, Mrs. Harold Krechmer, Helen C. Lanier, Burt N. Pedersen, John Solum, and Erica D. White, by exchange, 1986 (1986.239)

Clavichords were built as far back as the early fifteenth century, and perhaps earlier. This most personal, simplest, and quietest of European keyboard instruments was the perfect vehicle for music pedagogy, keyboard practice, and composition throughout its 400-year history. The action of the clavichord is relatively simple: the finger depresses a key which, working as a lever, causes its opposite end to rise so that a metal tongue (or tangent) hits a metal string, causing it to resonate. When the key is released, the string is damped. The clavichord is very quiet compared to the harpsichord or piano because of the inefficiency of its sound production, with the tangent hitting the string at the end of its resonating length, rather than in the middle. The tangent mechanism, however, allows a player to achieve a range, albeit narrow, of louder and softer tones as well as special effects like bebung, a form of vibrato, so that the clavichord was and is valued for its intimate expressiveness. Earlier clavichords were fretted, that is, a single string might be used to create several different notes, depending on where a tangent struck it. Unfretted clavichords, with a single note per string, came into use in the late seventeenth century.
This unfretted instrument, one of two known clavichords by Kintzing, is equipped with a pantalon stop, an unusual feature consisting of a second row of tangents under the keyboard that aided in sustaining tones. metmuseum

Clavichord, 1763
Christian Kintzing
Neuwied, Germany
Wood

W. 54 3/8 in. (138.2 cm), L. perpendicular to keyboard 18 1/4 in. (46.3 cm), H. of case 4 in. (10.1 cm)
Purchase, The Crosby Brown Collection of Musical Instruments, by exchange, Rogers Fund, The Barrington Foundation, Inc. Gift, and Gifts of George Bashlow, Mr. and Mrs. Jason Berger, in honor of Angna Enters, Risa and David Bernstein, Carroll C. Beverly, and Garry S. Bratman, Miss Alice Getty, Mrs. Harold Krechmer, Helen C. Lanier, Burt N. Pedersen, John Solum, and Erica D. White, by exchange, 1986 (1986.239)

Clavichords were built as far back as the early fifteenth century, and perhaps earlier. This most personal, simplest, and quietest of European keyboard instruments was the perfect vehicle for music pedagogy, keyboard practice, and composition throughout its 400-year history. The action of the clavichord is relatively simple: the finger depresses a key which, working as a lever, causes its opposite end to rise so that a metal tongue (or tangent) hits a metal string, causing it to resonate. When the key is released, the string is damped. The clavichord is very quiet compared to the harpsichord or piano because of the inefficiency of its sound production, with the tangent hitting the string at the end of its resonating length, rather than in the middle. The tangent mechanism, however, allows a player to achieve a range, albeit narrow, of louder and softer tones as well as special effects like bebung, a form of vibrato, so that the clavichord was and is valued for its intimate expressiveness. Earlier clavichords were fretted, that is, a single string might be used to create several different notes, depending on where a tangent struck it. Unfretted clavichords, with a single note per string, came into use in the late seventeenth century.

This unfretted instrument, one of two known clavichords by Kintzing, is equipped with a pantalon stop, an unusual feature consisting of a second row of tangents under the keyboard that aided in sustaining tones. metmuseum

blueruins:

The Dream (1978) by Marc Chagall
Pipa, Ming dynasty (1368–1644), late 15th–early 16th centuryChinaWood, ivory, bone, silk
L. 37 in. (94 cm), W. 9 15/16 in. (25.3 cm), D. 1 1/8 in. (2.9 cm)Bequest of Mary Stillman Harkness, 1950 (50.145.74)

The pear-shaped lute slowly migrated from Central Asia into China during the Han and Sui dynasties (1st–7th century). It eventually became the pipa; the term describes the original playing motion of the plectrum held in the performer’s right hand: p’i, “to play forward” (toward the left), and p’a, “to play backward” (toward the right). Until the mid-tenth century, the pipa was held horizontally (guitar style), and its twisted silk strings were plucked with a large triangular plectrum. Toward the end of the Tang dynasty, musicians began using their fingernails to execute the exuberant and programmatic repertory that was gaining popularity and that became the national style. To facilitate the use of the fingers, the instrument began to be held in a more upright position. In addition to its use in the opera and in storytelling ensembles, the pipa has a solo repertory of highly programmatic, virtuosic music.
The spectacular back and sides of this unique Ming-dynasty instrument feature more than 110 hexagonal ivory plaques, with thinner bone plaques on the neck. Each plaque is carved with Daoist, Confucian, or Buddhist figures and symbols signifying prosperity, happiness, and good luck. These include images of various gods and immortals, such as Shou Lao, the Daoist god of longevity, who is shown with a more prominent forehead on the single plaque at the very top. When the instrument is played, this expert workmanship remains unseen by the listener, as the back faces the player. The front is relatively plain but shows signs of use. The ivory string holder bears a scene featuring four figures and a bridge; an archaic cursive inscription; and, at the lip, a bat motif with leafy tendrils. Above the lower frets, two small insets depict a spider and a bird, and just before the rounded upper frets, a trapezoidal plaque portrays two men, one with a fish. The finial repeats the bat (good luck) motif. metmuseum

Pipa, Ming dynasty (1368–1644), late 15th–early 16th century
China
Wood, ivory, bone, silk

L. 37 in. (94 cm), W. 9 15/16 in. (25.3 cm), D. 1 1/8 in. (2.9 cm)
Bequest of Mary Stillman Harkness, 1950 (50.145.74)

The pear-shaped lute slowly migrated from Central Asia into China during the Han and Sui dynasties (1st–7th century). It eventually became the pipa; the term describes the original playing motion of the plectrum held in the performer’s right hand: p’i, “to play forward” (toward the left), and p’a, “to play backward” (toward the right). Until the mid-tenth century, the pipa was held horizontally (guitar style), and its twisted silk strings were plucked with a large triangular plectrum. Toward the end of the Tang dynasty, musicians began using their fingernails to execute the exuberant and programmatic repertory that was gaining popularity and that became the national style. To facilitate the use of the fingers, the instrument began to be held in a more upright position. In addition to its use in the opera and in storytelling ensembles, the pipa has a solo repertory of highly programmatic, virtuosic music.

The spectacular back and sides of this unique Ming-dynasty instrument feature more than 110 hexagonal ivory plaques, with thinner bone plaques on the neck. Each plaque is carved with Daoist, Confucian, or Buddhist figures and symbols signifying prosperity, happiness, and good luck. These include images of various gods and immortals, such as Shou Lao, the Daoist god of longevity, who is shown with a more prominent forehead on the single plaque at the very top. When the instrument is played, this expert workmanship remains unseen by the listener, as the back faces the player. The front is relatively plain but shows signs of use. The ivory string holder bears a scene featuring four figures and a bridge; an archaic cursive inscription; and, at the lip, a bat motif with leafy tendrils. Above the lower frets, two small insets depict a spider and a bird, and just before the rounded upper frets, a trapezoidal plaque portrays two men, one with a fish. The finial repeats the bat (good luck) motif. metmuseum


Yunluo (“cloud gong”), Qing dynasty (1644–1911), 19th century
China, Bronze H. of frame 28 in. (71.1 cm), W. 16 1/2 in. (41.9 cm), Diam. of largest gong 4 in. (10.2 cm)
The yunluo consists of ten tuned bronze gongs of varying thicknesses, which provide different pitches when struck with a small mallet. First cited in the early fourteenth century, this instrument was originally used at court and in Confucian ceremonies, but by the eighteenth century, it was also found at private rituals such as weddings and funerals. By the mid-twentieth century, it had been incorporated into large orchestras and was enlarged to twenty-four or more gongs struck with two mallets. metmuseum

Yunluo (“cloud gong”), Qing dynasty (1644–1911), 19th century

China, Bronze H. of frame 28 in. (71.1 cm), W. 16 1/2 in. (41.9 cm), Diam. of largest gong 4 in. (10.2 cm)

The yunluo consists of ten tuned bronze gongs of varying thicknesses, which provide different pitches when struck with a small mallet. First cited in the early fourteenth century, this instrument was originally used at court and in Confucian ceremonies, but by the eighteenth century, it was also found at private rituals such as weddings and funerals. By the mid-twentieth century, it had been incorporated into large orchestras and was enlarged to twenty-four or more gongs struck with two mallets. metmuseum



G F Watts - Love and life

G F Watts - Love and life

G F Watts - Love and Death

G F Watts - Love and Death

technicolorgypsy:

[ANTIQUE WORLD]
Sketches of the moon from Galileo’s “Sidereus Nuncius,” a short treatise on Galileo’s early observations of the Moon, the stars, and the moons of Jupiter; it was the first scientific treatise based on observations made through a telescope.

technicolorgypsy:

[ANTIQUE WORLD]

Sketches of the moon from Galileo’s “Sidereus Nuncius,” a short treatise on Galileo’s early observations of the Moon, the stars, and the moons of Jupiter; it was the first scientific treatise based on observations made through a telescope.