Music Lesson, 1877
Frederick Leighton

Music Lesson, 1877

Frederick Leighton

Mother And Child 1864-65
Frederick Leighton

Mother And Child 1864-65

Frederick Leighton

steros:

raven

steros:

raven

The Dance Of The Cymbalistes
Frederic Lord Leighton

The Dance Of The Cymbalistes

Frederic Lord Leighton

The Garden Of the Hesperides 1892
Frederic Lord Leighton

The Garden Of the Hesperides 1892

Frederic Lord Leighton

Amarilla
Frederick Leighton

Amarilla

Frederick Leighton

Idyll 1880-81
Frederick Leighton

Idyll 1880-81

Frederick Leighton

Perseus on Pegasus
Frederick Leighton

Perseus on Pegasus

Frederick Leighton

blogthoven:

Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy” from Tchaikovsky’s ballet “The Nutcracker.” Performed by William Zeitler on a glass armonica.

  Artemis:  :)

blogthoven:

Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy” from Tchaikovsky’s ballet “The Nutcracker.” Performed by William Zeitler on a glass armonica.

  Artemis:  :)

I think if you search for Glass Harmonica in my archive I posted a couple of pieces- it is the most unlikely instrument- ethereal and beautiful- so aproporiate for your site- x

I didn’t see this until after I posted. I’ll search for your post as well. Thank you, lushlight… for the help and the kind words.  :)  


We’ve known about the ‘wet-finger-around-the-wine-glass’ idea since Renaissance times—one of the first people to write about that phenomenon was Galileo. Sets of water-tuned glasses on which you can play tunes were popularized in England by Pockridge and Gluck in the early 1700’s.
In 1761 Benjamin Franklin was in London representing the Pennsylvania Legislature to Parliament. Franklin was very interested in music: he was a capable amateur musician, attended concerts regularly, and even wrote a string quartet! One of the concerts Franklin attended was by Deleval, a colleague of his in the Royal Academy, who performed on a set of water tuned wineglasses patterned after Pockridge’s instrument. Franklin was enchanted, and determined to invent and build ‘a more convenient’ arrangement. Franklin’s new invention premiered in early 1762, played by Marianne Davies—a well known musician in London who learned to play Franklin’s new invention. Initially Franklin named it the ‘glassychord’, but soon settled on ‘armonica’ as the name for his new invention—after the Italian word for harmony “armonia”. Apparently Franklin built a second instrument for Ms. Davies, as she toured Europe with hers, while Franklin returned to Philadelphia with his… read more: http://www.glassarmonica.com/
This is wonderful, dualkelly. Thank you. :)

We’ve known about the ‘wet-finger-around-the-wine-glass’ idea since Renaissance times—one of the first people to write about that phenomenon was Galileo. Sets of water-tuned glasses on which you can play tunes were popularized in England by Pockridge and Gluck in the early 1700’s.

In 1761 Benjamin Franklin was in London representing the Pennsylvania Legislature to Parliament. Franklin was very interested in music: he was a capable amateur musician, attended concerts regularly, and even wrote a string quartet! One of the concerts Franklin attended was by Deleval, a colleague of his in the Royal Academy, who performed on a set of water tuned wineglasses patterned after Pockridge’s instrument. Franklin was enchanted, and determined to invent and build ‘a more convenient’ arrangement. Franklin’s new invention premiered in early 1762, played by Marianne Davies—a well known musician in London who learned to play Franklin’s new invention. Initially Franklin named it the ‘glassychord’, but soon settled on ‘armonica’ as the name for his new invention—after the Italian word for harmony “armonia”. Apparently Franklin built a second instrument for Ms. Davies, as she toured Europe with hers, while Franklin returned to Philadelphia with his… read more: http://www.glassarmonica.com/

This is wonderful, dualkelly. Thank you. :)

I think if you search for Glass Harmonica in my archive I posted a couple of pieces- it is the most unlikely instrument- ethereal and beautiful- so aproporiate for your site- x

I didn’t see this until after I posted. I’ll search for your post as well. Thank you, lushlight… for the help and the kind words.  :)