Thomas BanksThetis dipping Achilles into the River Styx 1790Victoria and Albert Museum 
This sculpture shows Achilles, the hero of Homer’s Greek epic The Iliad, as an infant, being dipped in the river Styx by his mother, Thetis. The waters made him invulnerable, apart from the small area on his heel where Thetis holds him, hence the phrase, ‘Achilles’ heel’. The head of Thetis is a portrait of Jane, the wife of Thomas Johnes (1748-1816), who commissioned this sculpture. The head of Achilles is that of their baby daughter, Mariamne.
Thomas Banks
Thetis dipping Achilles into the River Styx 1790
Victoria and Albert Museum

This sculpture shows Achilles, the hero of Homer’s Greek epic The Iliad, as an infant, being dipped in the river Styx by his mother, Thetis. The waters made him invulnerable, apart from the small area on his heel where Thetis holds him, hence the phrase, ‘Achilles’ heel’. The head of Thetis is a portrait of Jane, the wife of Thomas Johnes (1748-1816), who commissioned this sculpture. The head of Achilles is that of their baby daughter, Mariamne.


Thetis Roman Marble 2nd century CE
detail



Silver-footed Thetis:( Θέτις), disposer or “placer” (the one who places), is encountered in Greek mythology mostly as a sea nymph or known as the goddess of water, one of the fifty Nereids, daughters of the ancient one of the seas with shape-shifting abilities who survives in the historical vestiges of most later Greek myths as Proteus (whose name suggests the “first”, the “primordial” or the “firstborn”).
When described as a Nereid in Classical myths, Thetis was the daughter of Nereus and Doris (Hesiod Theogony), and a granddaughter of Tethys with whom she sometimes shares characteristics. Often she seems to lead the Nereids as they attend to her tasks. Sometimes she also is identified with Metis.
It is likely, however, that she was one of the earliest of deities worshiped in Archaic Greece,  the oral traditions and records of which are lost. Only one written record, a fragment, exists attesting to her worship and an early Alcman hymn exists that identifies Thetis as the creator of the universe. Worship of Thetis as the goddess is documented to have persisted in some regions by historical writers such as Pausanias. 
In the Trojan War cycle of myth, the wedding of Thetis and the Greek hero Peleus is one of the precipitating events in the war, leading also to the birth of their child Achilles. wiki

Thetis Roman Marble 2nd century CE

detail

Silver-footed Thetis:( Θέτις), disposer or “placer” (the one who places), is encountered in Greek mythology mostly as a sea nymph or known as the goddess of water, one of the fifty Nereids, daughters of the ancient one of the seas with shape-shifting abilities who survives in the historical vestiges of most later Greek myths as Proteus (whose name suggests the “first”, the “primordial” or the “firstborn”).

When described as a Nereid in Classical myths, Thetis was the daughter of Nereus and Doris (Hesiod Theogony), and a granddaughter of Tethys with whom she sometimes shares characteristics. Often she seems to lead the Nereids as they attend to her tasks. Sometimes she also is identified with Metis.

It is likely, however, that she was one of the earliest of deities worshiped in Archaic Greece,  the oral traditions and records of which are lost. Only one written record, a fragment, exists attesting to her worship and an early Alcman hymn exists that identifies Thetis as the creator of the universe. Worship of Thetis as the goddess is documented to have persisted in some regions by historical writers such as Pausanias. 

In the Trojan War cycle of myth, the wedding of Thetis and the Greek hero Peleus is one of the precipitating events in the war, leading also to the birth of their child Achilles. wiki

patferry:

Brandt Brauer Frick have no time for cultural pessimism. These three guys are way too busy actualizing their own unique vision of purely acoustic dance music “that sounds as if you created a common denominator for Steve Reich and Theo Parrish” (Groove Magazine). It makes sense then that You Make Me Real is the name of their debut LP – a dialogue between work and artist, a thank-you to the comrades-in-arms, a declaration of love to the listener. And a bow before the spiritual fathers.

“Using the tonal richness of classical instruments to play techno feels very natural for us, one can say that our music has grown organically out of our backgrounds. We had felt for years that most instances of combining techno and classical music lack an authentic approach. Instead of using only the typical epic orchestra or piano sounds, we love to explore the dirty and percussive sides of those instruments, adapting techniques from composers like John Cage or Helmut Lachenmann: preparing our piano with screws and rubbers, knocking against every single part of an instrument, until we find that one great sound.”

Whereas Daniel Brandt and Jan Brauer had already met in the Jazz Band of their school and later founded the project “Scott,” playing jazz-influenced club music, Paul Frick had studied classical composition with Friedrich Goldmann at the Berlin University of the Arts (UdK). When the three met in 2008, they discovered quickly that they should make music together. After releasing EPs on Tartelet Records and their self-founded labels Doppelschall and The Gym, their debut album You Make Me Real on !K7 is most intense manifestation of their unique chemistry so far.

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