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From Wiki:  ”There are four major categories of Noh performers:  shite, waki, kyōgen, and hayashi.

Shite (仕手, シテ). In plays where the shite appears first as a human and then as a ghost, the first role is known as the maeshite and the later as the nochishite.

  • Shitetsure (仕手連れ, シテヅレ). The shite’s companion. Sometimes shitetsure is abbreviated to tsure (連れ, ツレ), although this term refers to both the shitetsure and the wakitsure.
  • Kōken (後見) are stage hands, usually one to three people.
  • Jiutai (地謡) is the chorus, usually comprising six to eight people.

Waki (脇, ワキ) performs the role that is the counterpart or foil of the shite.

  • Wakitsure (脇連れ, ワキヅレ) or Waki-tsure is the companion of the waki.

Kyōgen (狂言) perform the aikyōgen (相狂言) interludes during plays. Kyōgen actors also perform in separate plays between individual noh plays.

Hayashi (囃子) or hayashi-kata (囃子方) are the instrumentalists who play the four instruments used in Noh theater: the transverse flute (笛 fue?), hip drum (大鼓 ōtsuzumi) or ōkawa (大皮), the shoulder-drum (小鼓 kotsuzumi?), and the stick-drum (太鼓 taiko ). The flute used for noh is specifically called nōkan or nohkan (能管).

A typical Noh play always involves the chorus, the orchestra, and at least one shite and one waki actor.”

Chôken (Nô Costume), 1901/25, Meiji period (1868-1912)/ Taishô period (1912-1926)
Silk and gold-leaf-over-lacquered-paper strips, complex gauze weave with supplementary brocading wefts 125.4 x 207 cm (49 x 81 1/2 in.)Art Institute of Chicago gift of Mrs. J. L. Valentine, 1928.812

Chôken (Nô Costume), 1901/25, Meiji period (1868-1912)/ Taishô period (1912-1926)

Silk and gold-leaf-over-lacquered-paper strips, complex gauze weave with supplementary brocading wefts
125.4 x 207 cm (49 x 81 1/2 in.)
Art Institute of Chicago gift of Mrs. J. L. Valentine, 1928.812

 
Japan, Nô Costume (Awase kariginu, Sashinuki and Koshi obi), a-b: late Edo/early Meiji period, 19th century; c-d: Late Meiji period, late 19th century or early 20th century
Art Institute of Chicago
a: silk, complex gauze weave self-patterned by areas of plain interlacing with silk tapes of 3:1 twill oblique interlacing, ikat; lined; plain weave; b: silk, weft-ribbed plain weave; waist band and ties: silk, plain weave; cords: silk, four element square braid, three element ply; c: silk, warp-faced, weft-ribbed plain weave; warp ikat; embroidered in satin, stem and straight stitches; couching; four element square braid fringe; d: plain weave. a: 96.5 x 148.6 cm (38 x 58 1/2 in.)  a repeat: 23 x 15.5 cm (9 1/8 x 6 1/2 in.) b: 165.1 x 59.3 cm (65 x 23 3/8 in.)  c: 65 x 9.2 cm (25 1/2 x 3 5/8 in.)  d: 240 x 8 cm (94 5/8 x 3 1/8 in.)Oriental Department Sundry Trust Fund, 1940.1102a-d

 

Japan, Nô Costume (Awase kariginu, Sashinuki and Koshi obi), a-b: late Edo/early Meiji period, 19th century; c-d: Late Meiji period, late 19th century or early 20th century

Art Institute of Chicago

a: silk, complex gauze weave self-patterned by areas of plain interlacing with silk tapes of 3:1 twill oblique interlacing, ikat; lined; plain weave; b: silk, weft-ribbed plain weave; waist band and ties: silk, plain weave; cords: silk, four element square braid, three element ply; c: silk, warp-faced, weft-ribbed plain weave; warp ikat; embroidered in satin, stem and straight stitches; couching; four element square braid fringe; d: plain weave. a: 96.5 x 148.6 cm (38 x 58 1/2 in.)  a repeat: 23 x 15.5 cm (9 1/8 x 6 1/2 in.) b: 165.1 x 59.3 cm (65 x 23 3/8 in.)  c: 65 x 9.2 cm (25 1/2 x 3 5/8 in.)  d: 240 x 8 cm (94 5/8 x 3 1/8 in.)
Oriental Department Sundry Trust Fund, 1940.1102a-d

Noh costume (chôken)
Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Japanese, Edo period, 18th century 
JapanDimensions105.4 x 205.8 cm (41 1/2 x 81 1/48 in.)Medium or TechniqueSilk gauze ground with silk and gilt-paper strip discontinuous supplementary patterning wefts

Noh costume (chôken)

Museum of Fine Arts Boston

Japanese, Edo period, 18th century 

JapanDimensions105.4 x 205.8 cm (41 1/2 x 81 1/48 in.)Medium or TechniqueSilk gauze ground with silk and gilt-paper strip discontinuous supplementary patterning wefts

Our imagination flies — we are its shadow on the earth.
Vladimir Nabokov 

From religionfacts.com:   “According to Buddhist tradition, Tara was born out of the tears of compassion of the bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara. It is said that he wept as he looked upon the world of suffering beings, and his tears formed a lake in which a lotus sprung up. When the lotus opened, the goddess Tara was revealed.”

From religionfacts.com:   “According to Buddhist tradition, Tara was born out of the tears of compassion of the bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara. It is said that he wept as he looked upon the world of suffering beings, and his tears formed a lake in which a lotus sprung up. When the lotus opened, the goddess Tara was revealed.”

Butterfly   HERE

Photography: Josephine Cardin  

Model/Dancer: Lisa Ushino  

In Dark Light - Josephine Cardin  HERE 

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Cello by Ikmal_Ibrahim

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Self-portrait

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