Rocamadour Landscape, 1925
Felix Vallotton
See archive for more:  HERE 

Rocamadour Landscape, 1925

Felix Vallotton

See archive for more:  HERE 

Jacquelyn Jablonski by Nick Knight for Hermes  (via: fashiontothecore.wordpress)

Jacquelyn Jablonski by Nick Knight for Hermes  (via: fashiontothecore.wordpress)


Aurore de La Morinerie


Catching The Butterfly
AntoniaHera on deviantart HERE

Catching The Butterfly

AntoniaHera on deviantart HERE


Xin Yuan (VelvetMomoKo)  HERE  (Found on i.mtime.com)

Xin Yuan (VelvetMomoKo)  HERE  (Found on i.mtime.com)


artemisvoice:

Click image for Audio

AMAD - Composed by Duke Ellington

Originally by Duke Ellington from the Far East Suite

Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis

From Wiki:  ”The Far East Suite is an album by Duke Ellington and his orchestra, recorded in New York City on 19 December to 21 December 1966. The nine compositions on the original album were all composed by Ellington and Billy Strayhorn (except for one by Ellington); a 1995 reissue added four previously unreleased alternative takes. In 2003, Bluebird Records issued the album as a Digipak CD with additional bonus takes.

The album’s title is something of a misnomer: as Richard Cook and Brian Morton have noted, “it really should have been The Near East Suite.” Strictly speaking, only one track – “Ad Lib on Nippon”, inspired by a 1964 tour of Japan – is concerned with a country in the “Far East”. The rest of the music on the album was inspired by a world tour undertaken by Ellington and his orchestra in 1963, which took in Beirut, Amman, Kabul, New Delhi, Sri Lanka, Tehran, Madras, Mumbai, Baghdad, and Cairo (visits to Istanbul, Nicosia, Cairo, Alexandria, Athens, and Thessaloniki were postponed when the news of the assassination of John F. Kennedy reached the tour party).

In early 1964, while on tour in England, Ellington and Strayhorn performed four pieces of music for the first time (“Mynah”, “Depk”, “Agra”, and “Amad”), which they called “Expressions of the Far East”. By the time of the recording sessions in late 1966 Ellington and Strayhorn had added four more pieces. One, the latter’s “Isfahan” was formerly known as “Elf”, and had in fact been written months prior to the 1963 tour.

Ellington very rarely performed the pieces that made up The Far East Suite. Cook and Morton have suggested that “Isfahan”, which later became a jazz standard, “is arguably the most beautiful item in Ellington’s and Strayhorn’s entire output.” The album had a big impact on the Asian American jazz movement. In 1999, Anthony Brown recorded the entire suite with his Asian-American Orchestra. Unlike the 1967 album, Brown’s version used Eastern instruments along with standard jazz instruments.

Cook and Morton, writing for The Penguin Guide to Jazz, give the album a four-star rating (of a possible four), noting that “Ellington’s ability to communicate points of contact and conflict between cultures, assimilating the blues to Eastern modes in tracks like ‘Blue Pepper (Far East of the Blues),’ never sounds unduly self-conscious. This remains a postwar peak.” Scott Yanow, writing for allmusic, calls this one of Ellington’s “more memorable recordings,” describing it as an example of “Ellington and Strayhorn in their late prime,” and as such, “quite essential.”

Participating in Down Beat’ s Blindfold Test shortly after the album’s release, composer-arranger Clare Fischer was played track #7, “Agra.” A longtime admirer and student of Ellington’s work, Fischer had no trouble identifying the artist, awarding the track five stars, citing both “Duke’s immensely creative writing” and his inexplicable ability to transcend “this same old tired instrumentation of trumpets, trombones and saxophones,” while “perfect[ly] utilizing the men’s specific sounds.” In addition, Fischer praised Ellington’s ability to “take an exotic-sounding idea and create something – you might call it sophisticated crudity. It gives both qualities that I look for – an earthy quality and the sophisticated quality.”

Track listing

(All compositions by Ellington & Strayhorn except 9. by Ellington.)

"Tourist Point of View" – 5:09

"Bluebird of Delhi (Mynah)" – 3:18

"Isfahan" – 4:02

"Depk" – 2:38

"Mount Harissa" – 7:40

"Blue Pepper (Far East of the Blues)" – 3:00

"Agra" – 2:35

"Amad" – 4:26

"Ad Lib on Nippon" – 11:34

Bonus tracks

"Tourist Point of View" (alternative take) – 4:58

"Bluebird of Delhi (Mynah)" (alternative take) – 3:08

"Isfahan" (alternative take) – 4:11

"Amad" (alternative take) – 4:15


                                                         


Copper alloy hollow cast statue of the princess-priestess Takushit.

From namuseum.gr:  ”Lacking its base into which it was set by means of two attachments, which are rectangular in cross-section, placed on the soles of the feet.
The statue was found in 1880, in Lower Egypt, on the hill of Kom-Toruga, near Lake Mariut, south of Alexandria. Late Period, end of 25th Dynasty, ca. 670 BC. It had ritual, votive, and funerary functions. The statue is depicted striding soundly with its two feet; the left foot is forward in a walking stance, indicative of movement and energy. The left arm is bent under the chest and most likely held a hieratic scepter. The right arm, extended closely against the body, held the menit (musical instrument and necklace). The scepter and the menit make clear her priestly status and her high social position and were the symbol par excellence of priests from the higher social classes. The long, diaphanous robe, which is decorated all over with incised patterns that were filled with precious metal wires (technique of damasking), accentuates the beautifully shaped, sensuous body. The decoration is divided into fine horizontal bands, which alternate with four thinner strips at the midsection, the pelvis, the thighs, and the knees. The first band, which covers the torso, is wider. The bands are decorated with representations of divinities from the Northeastern area of the Nile Delta (the homeland of Takushit), while the strips are filled with hieroglyphs that communicate prayers to the said divinities. Her name means “the Ethiopian” and possibly refers to a family connection to or a marriage with an Ethiopian. According to the inscriptions that the statue bears, her father was Akan II, the Great Chief of the Libyan tribe Ma, and her office was of priestess “waab” (pure-chaste priestess), which according to the religious hierarchy was the lowest priestly title.  The use of the statue was ceremonial while the priestess was alive, and was part of the ritual equipment of the sanctuary, in which there was a priestess. After her death, it was used for votive and funerary ends and it decorated her tomb, which, according to the custom of the time, is located within the sanctuary precinct.”  via:  namuseum.gr

                                                         

Copper alloy hollow cast statue of the princess-priestess Takushit.

From namuseum.gr:  ”Lacking its base into which it was set by means of two attachments, which are rectangular in cross-section, placed on the soles of the feet.

The statue was found in 1880, in Lower Egypt, on the hill of Kom-Toruga, near Lake Mariut, south of Alexandria. Late Period, end of 25th Dynasty, ca. 670 BC. It had ritual, votive, and funerary functions.

The statue is depicted striding soundly with its two feet; the left foot is forward in a walking stance, indicative of movement and energy. The left arm is bent under the chest and most likely held a hieratic scepter. The right arm, extended closely against the body, held the menit (musical instrument and necklace). The scepter and the menit make clear her priestly status and her high social position and were the symbol par excellence of priests from the higher social classes. The long, diaphanous robe, which is decorated all over with incised patterns that were filled with precious metal wires (technique of damasking), accentuates the beautifully shaped, sensuous body. The decoration is divided into fine horizontal bands, which alternate with four thinner strips at the midsection, the pelvis, the thighs, and the knees. The first band, which covers the torso, is wider. The bands are decorated with representations of divinities from the Northeastern area of the Nile Delta (the homeland of Takushit), while the strips are filled with hieroglyphs that communicate prayers to the said divinities.

Her name means “the Ethiopian” and possibly refers to a family connection to or a marriage with an Ethiopian. According to the inscriptions that the statue bears, her father was Akan II, the Great Chief of the Libyan tribe Ma, and her office was of priestess “waab” (pure-chaste priestess), which according to the religious hierarchy was the lowest priestly title.

The use of the statue was ceremonial while the priestess was alive, and was part of the ritual equipment of the sanctuary, in which there was a priestess. After her death, it was used for votive and funerary ends and it decorated her tomb, which, according to the custom of the time, is located within the sanctuary precinct.”  via:  namuseum.gr

Girl on a Swing
Everett Shinn 


From Wiki:  ”Everett Shinn (November 6, 1876 – May 1, 1953) was an American realist painter and member of the Ashcan School. He also exhibited with the short-lived group known as “The Eight,” who protested the restrictive exhibition policies of the powerful, conservative National Academy of Design. He is best known for his robust paintings of urban life in New York and London, a hallmark of Ashcan art, and for his theater and residential murals and interior-design projects. His style varied considerably over the years, from gritty and realistic to decorative and rococo.”

Girl on a Swing

Everett Shinn 


From Wiki:  ”Everett Shinn (November 6, 1876 – May 1, 1953) was an American realist painter and member of the Ashcan School. He also exhibited with the short-lived group known as “The Eight,” who protested the restrictive exhibition policies of the powerful, conservative National Academy of Design. He is best known for his robust paintings of urban life in New York and London, a hallmark of Ashcan art, and for his theater and residential murals and interior-design projects. His style varied considerably over the years, from gritty and realistic to decorative and rococo.”


Back Row, Follies Bergere, 1900
Everett Shinn

Back Row, Follies Bergere, 1900

Everett Shinn

Fifth Avenue, 1910
Everett Shinn

Fifth Avenue, 1910

Everett Shinn

Window Shopping, 1905, Private Collection
Everett Shinn

Window Shopping, 1905, Private Collection

Everett Shinn

The White Ballet, 1904,  Smithsonian
Everett Shinn

The White Ballet, 1904,  Smithsonian

Everett Shinn

Keith’s Union Square, Brooklyn Museum
Everett Shinn

Keith’s Union Square, Brooklyn Museum

Everett Shinn

Girl on Stage, 1906
Everett Shinn

Girl on Stage, 1906

Everett Shinn

Easter, 1902
Everett Shinn

Easter, 1902

Everett Shinn