Details of a Bouquet I
FeliDae84 on deviantart

Details of a Bouquet I

FeliDae84 on deviantart

Otagaki Rengetsu and Issō  (potter’s seal)'Night storm' tea bowl [chawan] 19th century glazed stoneware, incised calligraphy 7.0 x 11.6 cmPrivate collection, St Louis, National Gallery of Australia


Night storm – its ravages extinguishinginto snow.On waking, I light kindlingat Shigaraki village. 
(trans. Sayumi Takahashi)

Otagaki Rengetsu and Issō  (potter’s seal)
'Night storm' tea bowl [chawan] 19th century 
glazed stoneware, incised calligraphy 
7.0 x 11.6 cm
Private collection, St Louis, National Gallery of Australia

Night storm –
its ravages extinguishing
into snow.
On waking, I light kindling
at Shigaraki village. 

(trans. Sayumi Takahashi)

Bowl with Arabic Inscription
10th Century Central Asia, Hermitage Museum  

Bowl with Arabic Inscription

10th Century 
Central Asia, Hermitage Museum  

Alphabet calligraphie hébreu 
Michel D’anastasio  HERE

Alphabet calligraphie hébreu 

Michel D’anastasio  HERE

The fundamental delusion of humanity is to suppose that I am here and you are out there.
“
Yasutani Roshi

Noir

Hengki Koentjoro  HERE


Mindfulness

Hengki Koentjoro  HERE


iznogoodgood:  Charlie Chaplin


Artemis:  Thank you sesame-oil and iznogoodgood.  :)  

iznogoodgood:  Charlie Chaplin


Artemis:  Thank you  and iznogoodgood.  :)  


Garden of the Sorolla House, 1920, Sorolla Museum  
Joaquin Sorolla y Bastida 
See archive for more:  HERE  

Garden of the Sorolla House, 1920, Sorolla Museum  

Joaquin Sorolla y Bastida 

See archive for more:  HERE  




Mother, 1895, Sorolla Museum  
Joaquin Sorolla y Bastida  
See archive for more:  HERE 

Mother, 1895, Sorolla Museum  

Joaquin Sorolla y Bastida  

See archive for more:  HERE 


Hands
TaroYamamoto  HERE

Hands

TaroYamamoto  HERE


Dance (via:  picpost.postjung.com)

Dance (via:  picpost.postjung.com)


                                   


Silver Coffin of King Psusennes the First  (1st image via: egyking.com | 2nd image via: thecultureconcept.com )

From Wiki:  Psusennes I, or [Greek Ψουσέννης], Pasibkhanu or Hor-Pasebakhaenniut I [Egyptian ḥor-p3-sib3-ḫˁỉ-<n>-niwt] was the third king of the Twenty-first dynasty of Egypt who ruled from Tanis (Greek name for Dzann, Biblical Zoan) between 1047 – 1001 BC. Psusennes is the Greek version of his original name Pasebakhaenniut which means “The Star Appearing in the City” while his throne name, Akheperre Setepenamun, translates as “Great are the Manifestations of Ra, chosen of Amun.” He was the son of Pinedjem I and Henuttawy, Rameses XI’s daughter by Tentamun. He married his sister Mutnedjmet… 
… Psusennes I, himself, was interred in an “inner silver coffin” which was inlaid with gold.  Since “silver was considerably rarer in Egypt than gold,” Psusennes I’s silver “coffin represents a sumptuous burial of great wealth during Egypt’s declining years.”

                                   

Silver Coffin of King Psusennes the First  (1st image via: egyking.com | 2nd image via: thecultureconcept.com )

From Wiki:  Psusennes I, or [Greek Ψουσέννης], Pasibkhanu or Hor-Pasebakhaenniut I [Egyptian ḥor-p3-sib3-ḫˁỉ-<n>-niwt] was the third king of the Twenty-first dynasty of Egypt who ruled from Tanis (Greek name for Dzann, Biblical Zoan) between 1047 – 1001 BC. Psusennes is the Greek version of his original name Pasebakhaenniut which means “The Star Appearing in the City” while his throne name, Akheperre Setepenamun, translates as “Great are the Manifestations of Ra, chosen of Amun.” He was the son of Pinedjem I and Henuttawy, Rameses XI’s daughter by Tentamun. He married his sister Mutnedjmet… 

… Psusennes I, himself, was interred in an “inner silver coffin” which was inlaid with gold.  Since “silver was considerably rarer in Egypt than gold,” Psusennes I’s silver “coffin represents a sumptuous burial of great wealth during Egypt’s declining years.”

It is this admirable, this immortal, instinctive sense of beauty that leads us to look upon the spectacle of this world as a glimpse, a correspondence with heaven. Our unquenchable thirst for all that lies beyond, and that life reveals, is the liveliest proof of our immortality. It is both by poetry and through poetry, by music and through music, that the soul dimly descries the splendours beyond the tomb; and when an exquisite poem brings tears to our eyes, those tears are not a proof of overabundant joy: they bear witness rather to an impatient melancholy, a clamant demand by our nerves, our nature, exiled in imperfection, which would fain enter into immediate possession, while still on this earth, of a revealed paradise.


“

“
Charles Baudelaire, Selected Writings on Art and Literature 
Allegorical Figure of Painting, Metropolitan Museum of Art 
Charles-Antoine Coypel IV 


From Wiki:   &#8220;Charles-Antoine Coypel (11 July 1694 – 15 June 1752) was a French painter, art commentator, and playwright. He lived in Paris.[1] He was the son of the artist Antoine Coypel and grandson of Noël Coypel. Charles-Antoine inherited his father’s design and painting duties as premier peintre du roi (First Painter to the King) at the French court when his father died in 1722. He became premier peintre du roi and director of the Académie Royale in 1747. He received a number of commissions for paintings for the Palais de Versailles, and worked for Madame de Pompadour, the king’s mistress.&#8221;

See High-res.

Allegorical Figure of Painting, Metropolitan Museum of Art 

Charles-Antoine Coypel IV 

From Wiki:   “Charles-Antoine Coypel (11 July 1694 – 15 June 1752) was a French painter, art commentator, and playwright. He lived in Paris.[1] He was the son of the artist Antoine Coypel and grandson of Noël Coypel. Charles-Antoine inherited his father’s design and painting duties as premier peintre du roi (First Painter to the King) at the French court when his father died in 1722. He became premier peintre du roi and director of the Académie Royale in 1747. He received a number of commissions for paintings for the Palais de Versailles, and worked for Madame de Pompadour, the king’s mistress.”


See High-res.