Who, if I cried out, would hear me among the angels hierarchies?
“

Rainer Maria Rilke (via journalofanobody)


 Asahi (朝日, 旭, or あさひ) means “morning sun” in Japanese  
Compound of 朝 (asa, “morning”) +‎ 日 (hi, “sun”) (ryuurui.wetcanvas.com)


Asahi (朝日, 旭, or あさひ) means “morning sun” in Japanese 

Compound of 朝 (asa, “morning”) +‎ 日 (hi, “sun”) (ryuurui.wetcanvas.com)


 I know a bank where the wild thyme blows, 
Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows, 
Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine, 
With sweet musk-roses and with eglantine: 
There sleeps Titania sometime of the night, 
Lull’d in these flowers with dances and delight
 ~William Shakespeare,  A Midsummer Night’s Dream: Act 2, Scene 1
  Image: Melvin Sokolsky (via:morefreaksho.blogspot)



I know a bank where the wild thyme blows, 

Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows, 

Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine, 

With sweet musk-roses and with eglantine: 

There sleeps Titania sometime of the night, 

Lull’d in these flowers with dances and delight



~William Shakespeare,  A Midsummer Night’s Dream: Act 2, Scene 1

  Image: Melvin Sokolsky (via:morefreaksho.blogspot)


Melvin Sokolsky (via: analee.livejournal)

Melvin Sokolsky (via: analee.livejournal)


Melvin Sokolsky (via: analee.livejournal)

Melvin Sokolsky (via: analee.livejournal)


Melvin Sokolsky (via: analee.livejournal)

Melvin Sokolsky (via: analee.livejournal)


Paul Klee Hand Puppets

Images:  Old Chum on Flickr   HERE 


Description from publishedart.com:  HERE   ”Between 1916 and 1925 Paul Klee (1879-1940) created a total of around fifty hand puppets for his son, Felix, of which thirty are still in existence. For the heads, the artist used materials from his own household: beef bones and electrical outlets, bristle brushes, leftover bits of fur, and nutshells. The first costumes were sewn by Sasha Morgenthaler, who later became a well-known puppet maker, but Klee soon took over this task himself. Although the hand puppets are a group of works that do not strive to be great art, they reflect the artistic and social developments of their time - the chronological proximity to Dada and the collages by Kurt Schwitters can be seen in Klee’s Specter of the Matchbox.

This volume presents Paul Klee’s superbly imaginative hand puppets and describes each figure in detail. An introductory essay is dedicated to Klee’s connection to the theater, his relationship to the puppets made by other avant-garde artists, and his sculptural works. Klee’s son, Felix, and his grandson, Alexander, relate how the figures were created.”


Dancer in Green Study
Edgar Degas (French, Paris 1834–1917 Paris)
Date: ca. 1883
Medium: Pastel on paper
Dimensions: Sheet: 27 15/16 x 14 15/16 in. (71 x 37.9cm)
Credit Line: Bequest of Joan Whitney Payson, 1975
Metropolitan Museum of Art - Accession Number: 1976.201.7
See archive for more Degas:  HERE

Artemis:  See high res.    

Dancer in Green Study

Edgar Degas (French, Paris 1834–1917 Paris)

Date: ca. 1883

Medium: Pastel on paper

Dimensions: Sheet: 27 15/16 x 14 15/16 in. (71 x 37.9cm)

Credit Line: Bequest of Joan Whitney Payson, 1975

Metropolitan Museum of Art - Accession Number: 1976.201.7

See archive for more Degas:  HERE


Artemis:  See high res.    


Two Dancers
Edgar Degas (French, Paris 1834–1917 Paris)
Date: 1873
Medium: Dark brown wash and white gouache on bright pink commercially coated wove paper, now faded to pale pink
Dimensions: 24 1/8 x 15 1/2 in. (61.3 x 39.4 cm)
Credit Line: H. O. Havemeyer Collection, Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer, 1929
Metropolitan Museum of Art - Accession Number: 29.100.187
See archive for more Degas:  HERE



Description from the Metropolitan Museum of Art: “This freely brushed drawing belongs to the stock of figure studies Degas executed in sepia wash on colored papers for his great rehearsal pictures of the mid-1870s. The dancers are posed to the left and right of the ballet master in The Dance Class (Musée d’Orsay, Paris), begun in 1873, and the one at right also appears, looking into a mirror, in the Metropolitan’s version of 1874 (1987.47.1).”

Two Dancers

Edgar Degas (French, Paris 1834–1917 Paris)

Date: 1873

Medium: Dark brown wash and white gouache on bright pink commercially coated wove paper, now faded to pale pink

Dimensions: 24 1/8 x 15 1/2 in. (61.3 x 39.4 cm)

Credit Line: H. O. Havemeyer Collection, Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer, 1929

Metropolitan Museum of Art - Accession Number: 29.100.187

See archive for more Degas:  HERE



Description from the Metropolitan Museum of Art: “This freely brushed drawing belongs to the stock of figure studies Degas executed in sepia wash on colored papers for his great rehearsal pictures of the mid-1870s. The dancers are posed to the left and right of the ballet master in The Dance Class (Musée d’Orsay, Paris), begun in 1873, and the one at right also appears, looking into a mirror, in the Metropolitan’s version of 1874 (1987.47.1).”


The Dance Class
Edgar Degas (French, Paris 1834–1917 Paris)
Date: 1874
Dimensions: 32 7/8 x 30 3/8 in. (83.5 x 77.2 cm)
Credit Line: Bequest of Mrs. Harry Payne Bingham, 1986
Metropolitan Museum of Art, Accession Number: 1987.47.1
See archive for more Degas:  HERE




Description from the Metropolitan Museum of Art:  ”This work and its variant in the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, represent the most ambitious paintings Degas devoted to the theme of the dance. Some twenty-four women, ballerinas and their mothers, wait while a dancer executes an “attitude” for her examination. Jules Perrot, a famous ballet master, conducts the class. The imaginary scene is set in a rehearsal room in the old Paris Opéra, which had recently burned to the ground. On the wall beside the mirror, a poster for Rossini’s Guillaume Tell pays tribute to the singer Jean-Baptiste Faure, who commissioned the picture and lent it to the 1876 Impressionist exhibition.”

The Dance Class

Edgar Degas (French, Paris 1834–1917 Paris)

Date: 1874

Dimensions: 32 7/8 x 30 3/8 in. (83.5 x 77.2 cm)

Credit Line: Bequest of Mrs. Harry Payne Bingham, 1986

Metropolitan Museum of Art, Accession Number: 1987.47.1

See archive for more Degas:  HERE



Description from the Metropolitan Museum of Art:  ”This work and its variant in the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, represent the most ambitious paintings Degas devoted to the theme of the dance. Some twenty-four women, ballerinas and their mothers, wait while a dancer executes an “attitude” for her examination. Jules Perrot, a famous ballet master, conducts the class. The imaginary scene is set in a rehearsal room in the old Paris Opéra, which had recently burned to the ground. On the wall beside the mirror, a poster for Rossini’s Guillaume Tell pays tribute to the singer Jean-Baptiste Faure, who commissioned the picture and lent it to the 1876 Impressionist exhibition.”


The Collector of Prints
Edgar Degas (French, Paris 1834–1917 Paris)
Date: 1866
Dimensions: 20 7/8 x 15 3/4 in. (53 x 40 cm)
Credit Line: H. O. Havemeyer Collection, Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer, 1929
Metropolitan Museum of Art  - Accession Number: 29.100.44
See archive for more Degas:  HERE



Description from the Metropolitan Museum of Art: “In this scene, cheap, outmoded prints—colored lithographs by the flower painter Pierre-Joseph Redouté—are coupled with a fashionable Tang dynasty horse and Japanese fabrics pinned on the bulletin board to typify an old-fashioned collector, obsessively accumulating an array of artworks. The depiction of individuals, interrupted at tasks amid settings that reveal clues about their character, was developed by Degas in numerous figure paintings of the 1860s and early 1870s.”

The Collector of Prints

Edgar Degas (French, Paris 1834–1917 Paris)

Date: 1866

Dimensions: 20 7/8 x 15 3/4 in. (53 x 40 cm)

Credit Line: H. O. Havemeyer Collection, Bequest of Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer, 1929

Metropolitan Museum of Art  - Accession Number: 29.100.44

See archive for more Degas:  HERE



Description from the Metropolitan Museum of Art: “In this scene, cheap, outmoded prints—colored lithographs by the flower painter Pierre-Joseph Redouté—are coupled with a fashionable Tang dynasty horse and Japanese fabrics pinned on the bulletin board to typify an old-fashioned collector, obsessively accumulating an array of artworks. The depiction of individuals, interrupted at tasks amid settings that reveal clues about their character, was developed by Degas in numerous figure paintings of the 1860s and early 1870s.”


As our eyes grow accustomed to sight they armour themselves against wonder. 
~Leonard Cohen, The Favorite Game
  Image:  drhguy.posterous

As our eyes grow accustomed to sight they armour themselves against wonder. 


~Leonard Cohen, The Favorite Game

  Image:  drhguy.posterous




Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional.
 
Buddhist proverb (image: sangye.it)
Pain is inevitable.
Suffering is optional.
 
Buddhist proverb (image: sangye.it)


Landscape with trees, 1900-02
Léon Spilliaert 
See archive for more:  HERE

Landscape with trees, 1900-02

Léon Spilliaert 

See archive for more:  HERE