Notes - Nocturne
James Abbott McNeill Whistler
View of the Battersea side of Chelsea Reach, London. Lithotint with scraping on a prepared half-tint ground, with blue chine appliqué. British Museum, London.
See archives for more James Abbott McNeill Whistler:  HERE

Notes - Nocturne

James Abbott McNeill Whistler


View of the Battersea side of Chelsea Reach, London. Lithotint with scraping on a prepared half-tint ground, with blue chine appliqué. British Museum, London.

See archives for more James Abbott McNeill Whistler:  HERE


15th century, Himalayas, nagaraja (naga king), gilt copper inlaid with turquoise, private collection


From Wiki:  ”Nagaraja is a Tamil word from naga (snake) and raja (king) meaning “king of snakes”. It is applied to three main deities, (Sheshanaga), Takshaka, and Vasuki. Ananda, Vasuki and Takshaka are brothers, children of Kashyapa and Kadru, who are the parents of all snakes.

Shesha, the eldest brother, was a devotee of Vishnu, and represents the friendly aspect of snakes, as they save food from rodents. Lord Vishnu is always on continuous meditation (Yoganidra) with Ananda forming a bed for him, and this posture is called Ananda-Sayana.

Vasuki, the younger one was a devotee of Lord Shiva. Lord Shiva always wears Vasuki around his neck.

Takshaka represents the dangerous aspect of snakes, as they are feared by all due to their venom.

At Nagercoil in Kanniyakumari district of Tamil Nadu, a temple dedicated to Nagaraja exists.

There is another famous temple named Mannarasala in Alleppey district of Kerala. The deity in this temple embodies both Anantha and Vasuki into one. a temple devoted to nagraja exists in kaippattoor of ernakulam distict in kerala,india it is known as thekkanattil nagaraja kshetram

A temple devoted to Nagaraja exists in Poojappura of Thiruvananthapuram District in Kerala, India. It is known as Poojappura nagarukavu Temple. The uniqueness of this temple is that here the family of the Nagaraja including Nagaramma, Queen of Naga and Nagakanya, Princess of the Naga kingdom is placed inside a single temple.”   Image via:  himalayanbuddhistart.files.wordpress

15th century, Himalayas, nagaraja (naga king), gilt copper inlaid with turquoise, private collection


From Wiki:  ”Nagaraja is a Tamil word from naga (snake) and raja (king) meaning “king of snakes”. It is applied to three main deities, (Sheshanaga), Takshaka, and Vasuki. Ananda, Vasuki and Takshaka are brothers, children of Kashyapa and Kadru, who are the parents of all snakes.

Shesha, the eldest brother, was a devotee of Vishnu, and represents the friendly aspect of snakes, as they save food from rodents. Lord Vishnu is always on continuous meditation (Yoganidra) with Ananda forming a bed for him, and this posture is called Ananda-Sayana.

Vasuki, the younger one was a devotee of Lord Shiva. Lord Shiva always wears Vasuki around his neck.

Takshaka represents the dangerous aspect of snakes, as they are feared by all due to their venom.

At Nagercoil in Kanniyakumari district of Tamil Nadu, a temple dedicated to Nagaraja exists.

There is another famous temple named Mannarasala in Alleppey district of Kerala. The deity in this temple embodies both Anantha and Vasuki into one. a temple devoted to nagraja exists in kaippattoor of ernakulam distict in kerala,india it is known as thekkanattil nagaraja kshetram

A temple devoted to Nagaraja exists in Poojappura of Thiruvananthapuram District in Kerala, India. It is known as Poojappura nagarukavu Temple. The uniqueness of this temple is that here the family of the Nagaraja including Nagaramma, Queen of Naga and Nagakanya, Princess of the Naga kingdom is placed inside a single temple.”   Image via:  himalayanbuddhistart.files.wordpress

Not the shadow on a man on the deserted hill -
And yet one hears voices speaking;
Deep in the seclusion of the woods,
Stray shafts of the sun pick out the green moss.

~Wáng Wéi, Deer Park 
tr. H.C. Chang
Image:  Poet on a Mountaintop,  Shěn Zhōu  



From Wiki:  ”Wang Wei (simplified Chinese: 王维; traditional Chinese: 王維; pinyin: Wáng Wéi; Wade–Giles: Wang Wei) (699-759 and also known by other names such as Wang Youcheng, was a Tang Dynasty Chinese poet, musician, painter, and statesman. He was one of the most famous men of arts and letters of his time. Many of his poems are preserved, and twenty-nine were included in the highly influential 18th century anthology Three Hundred Tang Poems.”




Artemis: the poem Deer Park is also known as The Empty Mountain.


Not the shadow on a man on the deserted hill -

And yet one hears voices speaking;

Deep in the seclusion of the woods,

Stray shafts of the sun pick out the green moss.


~Wáng Wéi, Deer Park 

tr. H.C. Chang

Image:  Poet on a Mountaintop,  Shěn Zhōu  


From Wiki:  ”Wang Wei (simplified Chinese: 王维; traditional Chinese: 王維; pinyin: Wáng Wéi; Wade–Giles: Wang Wei) (699-759 and also known by other names such as Wang Youcheng, was a Tang Dynasty Chinese poet, musician, painter, and statesman. He was one of the most famous men of arts and letters of his time. Many of his poems are preserved, and twenty-nine were included in the highly influential 18th century anthology Three Hundred Tang Poems.”


Artemis: the poem Deer Park is also known as The Empty Mountain.


Artemis:  Thank you, mindylulu and  largerloves.  :)

Artemis:  Thank you, mindylulu and  largerloves.  :)

Rastvorennaya Pechal - Distil Ennui

Alexander James  HERE  and HERE

Rastvorennaya Pechal, 17 April – 11 May 2014. Triumph Gallery, Moscow 

From Website:  ”…The style of Alexander James’s recent works aims towards the preservation and reconsideration within the photographic artwork of the characteristic expressive means from paintings of old. In certain still life’s, carried out with a thorough knowledge and genuine love for the texture of wide ranging materials (often preparing by creating sculptural models and objects to be used as props) and the metaphysical and symbolic functions of the depicted objects which serve as key elements that provide the entire composition with a cautionary-didactic sense (as described by the word vanitas), James is clearly recalling de Zurbaran and his followers, and also the Surrealists (the ‘Vanitas’ series, 2008–2013;  and ‘Swarm’ series). This is expressed, first and foremost, in a particular precision, the focusing of the optics, which makes all of the components in the compositional whole “palpable” in a certain inexpressible sensuality, then brought as close as possible to the viewer, who can do nothing other than struggle against the temptation to touch the surface of the photograph. Provocative effects of this kind are deeply coded in the artist’s concept. Nevertheless, he often says: “I don’t think about aesthetics – they’re born instinctively in the process of creation.” 

Alexander James’s Russian project, ‘Distil Ennui’, is constructed on an series that he has already tried — working on complex scenes submerged in purified water. The technique achieves a unique visual volume, the artist resorts to imposing a transparent, light layer of paint brush activation directly onto the surface of the water, in order to achieve a distinct “painterly” effect. This time, recalling the renowned canvas by John Everett Millais, ‘Ophelia’, and ‘Le Jeune Martyr’ by Paul Delaroche, James has created a series of works in which the figures of young, men, women, and children are captured floating freely in a stratum of water. This layer of water functions in each work as a special filter, transforming everything. The faces are covered over in ripples, they blur, sometimes they can’t be made out at all. The fabric of bright colours, in which the bodies of the individuals are wrapped, or the clothing of an indeterminate-romantic style in which they are dressed, under the water is made up of incredibly intricate, but always smooth, as in a slow-motion film, streaming folds and wrinkles. The continual and reciprocal shifting of lit and shadowed sections across the faces and bodies of the models, defined by the natural movement of underwater flows and eddies that can’t be made out by the naked eye, give the images a mysterious and enigmatic but genuinely painterly character that is stressed by the black, neutral background against which each figure stands out so effectively. Each figure is enclosed within themselves, forming their own individual space located on a conditional and unstable border between the real world and a fantastical vision, between reality and a dream. The refraction of the light and the colour under the layer of water makes each ray of light and each colour accent not only like a free stroke that virtuoso masters of the brush were capable of in their day, but also like the shifting texture of the paintings of the Impressionists and the internal dynamic structure of Expressionist canvases. Photography as an art, in this way, reciprocally exchanges roles with painting as an art form  through complex process and, moreover, both of them, it appears, are inspired by the visual discoveries of art house cinema…”    Read more: HERE,  creative-commons  

Razvan Boar  HERE

Razvan Boar  HERE

Samuel Barber “Agnus Dei”
(Adagio for strings opus 11
Transcription Samuel Barber)

Accentus Chamber Choir
Laurence Equilbey - conductor
Andy Sommer - film director  (via: youtube | musicca75)

I said to my soul, be still and wait without hope, for hope would be hope for the wrong thing; wait without love, for love would be love of the wrong thing; there is yet faith, but the faith and the love are all in the waiting. Wait without thought, for you are not ready for thought: So the darkness shall be the light, and the stillness the dancing.
~T.S. Eliot Image: images4you.ru/fotosajt-podborka

Reblog


I said to my soul, be still and wait without hope, for hope would be hope for the wrong thing; wait without love, for love would be love of the wrong thing; there is yet faith, but the faith and the love are all in the waiting. Wait without thought, for you are not ready for thought: So the darkness shall be the light, and the stillness the dancing.

~T.S. Eliot
Image: images4you.ru/fotosajt-podborka


Reblog

Untitled Alabaster
Anish Kapoor , b. 1954 ( Sotheby’s)
Queue

Untitled Alabaster

Anish Kapoor , b. 1954 ( Sotheby’s)

Queue

Adam Fuss  
Bird and Ladder 1994 
Artemis:  Thank you gacougnol.  :)

Adam Fuss  

Bird and Ladder
1994 

Artemis:  Thank you gacougnol.  :)

How Joan the Maid suffered Martyrdom at the Stake in the Market-Place of Rouen (via: savedfromthepaperdrive.blogspot)
 Kay Nielsen

How Joan the Maid suffered Martyrdom at the Stake in the Market-Place of Rouen (via: savedfromthepaperdrive.blogspot)

 Kay Nielsen

Elephant seen from below   Unknown  (via: Pinterest | Noel P)

I think this is an advertisement for the Zurich zoo elephant program.  The advertisement in color with text.  Not my edit.  Photographer:  Julien Vonier


Elephant seen from below  
Unknown  (via: Pinterest | Noel P)


I think this is an advertisement for the Zurich zoo elephant program.  The advertisement in color with text.  Not my edit.  Photographer:  Julien Vonier

She left pieces of her life behind her everywhere she went. It’s easier to feel the sunlight without them, she said.

 ~Brian Andreas Image:  3533.com  


She left pieces of her life behind her everywhere she went. It’s easier to feel the sunlight without them, she said.


 ~Brian Andreas
Image:  3533.com  



Nature of Language by José Parlá


Artist’s Statement:

"Nature of Language is a written painting for and about the nature of language, an abstract landscape of words, phrases, names, and poetic thoughts inspired drifting through Raleigh while on walks and visiting unexpected places through a playful survey that eyed various historical resources on a psycho-geographical exploration of the city on two occasions. The painting is a reflection of my awareness while visiting; a diary, and of these experiential observations that form the syntax of its visual vocabulary.

"Although illegible at first sight, the juxtaposed characters, gestures, hieroglyphs, and words become readable through feeling, as it is my hope that the work evokes the language of your own inner voice — of your own history. In an era where technology is taking over as the driving force of communication, art reminds us of our roots and our need for face-to-face communication. This Nature is our mirror, as art allows this bridge to be possible through the language of calligraphy, I pay homage to this Nature; to our selves, and the history of languages, which are the mirrors of our present condition. 

"I found inspiration in the essence of words and their combined power however abstract within a landscape of gestural forms and characters that serve as carriers of meaning. Within this meta-landscape a viewer is welcomed to read into or feel the Nature of this universal language putting grammatical forms on hold."

Title: Nature of Language 
Year: © 2013
Medium: Gesso, Acrylic, Ink, and Gamvar on wood.
Size: 12 x 12 ft.
Member: Artist’s Rights Society, New York

Artist Site:  HERE

Library Website: HERE 

Artist on Wiki:  HERE

.


Artemis:  I like this. The idea behind it. Language, calligraphy, form and that it was commissioned for a library.  See video below.   It’s interesting.  Dashboard click box below for video.  

(Video via:  youtube | THNKR)


              



siggautr:

One of the larger rocks of Nordic Bronze Age petroglyphs in Scandinavia, the Vitlyckehäll, is located in Tanumshede in Sweden.

In total there are thousands of images called the Tanum petroglyphs, on about 600 panels within the World Heritage Area. These are concentrated in distinct areas along a 25 km stretch, which was the coastline of a fjord during the Bronze Age, and covers an area of about 51 hectares (126 acres or 0.5 km²).

Scandinavian Bronze Age and Iron Age people were sophisticated craftsmen and very competent travelers by water. (Dates for ages vary with the region; in Scandinavia, the Bronze Age is roughly 1800 to 500 BCE) Many of the glyphs depict boats of which some seem to be of the Hjortspring boat type carrying around a dozen passengers. Wagons or carts are also depicted.

Other glyphs depict humans with a bow, spear or axe, and others depict hunting scenes. In all cases the pictures show people performing rituals. There is a human at a plough drawn by two oxen, holding what might be a branch or an ox-goading crop made of a number of strips of hide.

The rock carvings are endangered by erosion due to pollution. To the dismay of some archaeologists, some have been painted red to make them more visible for tourists.


Artemis:  thanks to siggautr and .  :)