Tea Cup Ballet, 1935,  gelatin silver
Art Gallery of New South Wales
Accession number 218.1980
Olive Cotton

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Image and description from the Art Gallery of New South Wales:  ”This picture evolved after I had bought some inexpensive cups and saucers from Woolworths for our studio coffee breaks to replace our rather worn old mugs. The angular handles reminded me of arms akimbo, and that led to the idea of making a photograph to express a dance theme.
When the day’s work was over I tried several arrangements of the cups and saucers to convey this idea, without success, until I used a spotlight and realised how important the shadows were. Using the studio camera, which had a 6 ½ x 4 ½ inch ground glass focusing screen, I moved the cups about until they and their shadows made a ballet-like composition and then photographed them on a cut film negative. The title of the photograph suggested itself.
This was my first photograph to be shown overseas, being exhibited, to my delight, in the London Salon of Photography in 1935.’ Olive Cotton 1995 1
Olive Cotton and Max Dupain were childhood friends and, although she graduated in English and mathematics from the University of Sydney in 1934, her interest in photography led her to work in Dupain’s studio from this year. Cotton was employed as a photographer’s assistant in the studio, however she worked assiduously on her own work and continued to exhibit in photography salon exhibitions. ‘Tea cup ballet’ is one of Cotton’s most well-known photographs and yet it is somewhat eccentric to her main practice, being at first glance typically modernist with its dramatic lighting and angular shapes. Her longstanding interest in organic forms provides a deeper reading. The abstraction of form by the lighting and the placement of the cups and saucers enables the relationship to dancers on a stage to become clear. 1. Ennis H 1995, ‘Olive Cotton: photographer’, National Library of Australia, Canberra p 25 © Art Gallery of New South Wales Photography Collection Handbook, 2007”

Tea Cup Ballet, 1935,  gelatin silver

Art Gallery of New South Wales

Accession number 218.1980

Olive Cotton

.

Image and description from the Art Gallery of New South Wales:  ”This picture evolved after I had bought some inexpensive cups and saucers from Woolworths for our studio coffee breaks to replace our rather worn old mugs. The angular handles reminded me of arms akimbo, and that led to the idea of making a photograph to express a dance theme.

When the day’s work was over I tried several arrangements of the cups and saucers to convey this idea, without success, until I used a spotlight and realised how important the shadows were. Using the studio camera, which had a 6 ½ x 4 ½ inch ground glass focusing screen, I moved the cups about until they and their shadows made a ballet-like composition and then photographed them on a cut film negative. The title of the photograph suggested itself.

This was my first photograph to be shown overseas, being exhibited, to my delight, in the London Salon of Photography in 1935.’ Olive Cotton 1995 1

Olive Cotton and Max Dupain were childhood friends and, although she graduated in English and mathematics from the University of Sydney in 1934, her interest in photography led her to work in Dupain’s studio from this year. Cotton was employed as a photographer’s assistant in the studio, however she worked assiduously on her own work and continued to exhibit in photography salon exhibitions. ‘Tea cup ballet’ is one of Cotton’s most well-known photographs and yet it is somewhat eccentric to her main practice, being at first glance typically modernist with its dramatic lighting and angular shapes. Her longstanding interest in organic forms provides a deeper reading. The abstraction of form by the lighting and the placement of the cups and saucers enables the relationship to dancers on a stage to become clear. 1. Ennis H 1995, ‘Olive Cotton: photographer’, National Library of Australia, Canberra p 25 © Art Gallery of New South Wales Photography Collection Handbook, 2007”

By my window, 1930, gelatin silver photograph, vintage
Art Gallery of New South Wales
Accession number 283.2006
Olive Cotton

By my window, 1930, gelatin silver photograph, vintage

Art Gallery of New South Wales

Accession number 283.2006

Olive Cotton

“Life has always presented humanity with new challenges to help us evolve and grow. Yet at each stage we are reluctant to “take upon us the mystery of things,” but would rather remain with the attitudes and conditioning that belong to a previous era. But a new way of life is waiting to come into being, and it needs us as midwives.

We just need to recognize the simple wonder of being alive, of being a part of life, and say an unconditional “yes” to being fully present at this moment of transition. Through this “yes” we open ourselves to what life needs. Then life can reveal to us how we can work together. Life is a living spiritual presence that knows its divine purpose of which we are a part.”

Excerpt From: Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee. “Darkening of the Light.”

(via parkstepp)
Kitano Tsunetomi  (1880~1947)
See archive for more Kitano Tsunetomi :  HERE

Kitano Tsunetomi  (1880~1947)

See archive for more Kitano Tsunetomi :  HERE

 



Kitano Tsunetomi (1880~1947) 

Artemis:  Ive posted a detail of this before, but it was very small and low quality. See High-res of the top image.  
See archive for more Kitano Tsunetomi :  HERE

 

Kitano Tsunetomi (1880~1947) 

Artemis:  Ive posted a detail of this before, but it was very small and low quality. See High-res of the top image.  

See archive for more Kitano Tsunetomi :  HERE
Kitano Tsunetomi  (1880~1947)
See archive for more Kitano Tsunetomi:  HERE

Kitano Tsunetomi  (1880~1947)

See archive for more Kitano Tsunetomi:  HERE

Kitano Tsunetomi  (1880~1947) 
See archive for more Kitano Tsunetomi:  HERE

Kitano Tsunetomi  (1880~1947) 

See archive for more Kitano Tsunetomi:  HERE
Kitano Tsunetomi  (1880~1947)
 See archive for more Kitano Tsunetomi :  HERE

Kitano Tsunetomi  (1880~1947)

 See archive for more Kitano Tsunetomi :  HERE

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In adventures such as these, I have squandered and wasted my years. It does not seem unlikely to me that there is a total book on some shelf of the universe;  I pray to the unknown gods that a man — just one, even though it were thousands of years ago! — may have examined and read it. If honor and wisdom and happiness are not for me, let them be for others. Let heaven exist, though my place be in hell. Let me be outraged and annihilated, but for one instant, in one being, let Your enormous Library be justified.
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~Jorge Luis Borges, The Library of Babel
Image:  Jorge Luis Borges in the old National Library, 1963 (via: joaquincast.blogspot)
Queue

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In adventures such as these, I have squandered and wasted my years. It does not seem unlikely to me that there is a total book on some shelf of the universe;  I pray to the unknown gods that a man — just one, even though it were thousands of years ago! — may have examined and read it. If honor and wisdom and happiness are not for me, let them be for others. Let heaven exist, though my place be in hell. Let me be outraged and annihilated, but for one instant, in one being, let Your enormous Library be justified.

.

~Jorge Luis Borges, The Library of Babel

Image:  Jorge Luis Borges in the old National Library, 1963 (via: joaquincast.blogspot)

Queue

Etchings for Jorge Luis Borges Library of Babel

Erik Desmazières

Queue 

Waterlilies or The Water Lily Pond, 1904, Denver Art Museum
Claude Monet

Waterlilies or The Water Lily Pond, 1904, Denver Art Museum

Claude Monet

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Be the change that you wish to see in the world.
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~Mahatma Gandhi
via: thomaspersonshall.com

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Be the change that you wish to see in the world.

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~Mahatma Gandhi

via: thomaspersonshall.com

TYPE+ME  pouneh mirlou  behance

TYPE+ME  pouneh mirlou  behance








Album Cover for Shamss Ensemble  Pournazeris & Alireza Ghorbani
pouneh mirlou behance

Album Cover for Shamss Ensemble  Pournazeris & Alireza Ghorbani

pouneh mirlou behance

Melody of Persian Letters 
pouneh mirlou

Melody of Persian Letters 

pouneh mirlou