Work from Série du couple and Série humanum, héliogravure, photopolymer film

Pierre Cambon HERE


Jidai Matsuri Festival  ajpscs  (via: NYoshi on pinterest  HERE)

From Wiki:  ”The Jidai Matsuri (時代祭り) Festival of the Ages is a traditional Japanese festival (also called the matsuri) held on October 22 annually in Kyoto, Japan. It is one of Kyoto’s renowned three great festivals, with the other two being the Aoi Matsuri, held annually on May 15, and the Gion Matsuri, which is held annually from 17 to July 24. It is a festival enjoyed by people of all ages, participating in its historical reenactment parade dressed in authentic costumes representing various periods, and characters in Japanese feudal history.

Jidai Matsuri traces its roots with the relocation of the Japanese capital to Tokyo in 1868. This involved the relocation of the Emperor of Japan and his imperial family, the Imperial Palace and thousands of government officials and subjects to the city. Fearing for Kyoto’s loss in glory and interest by her people, the city government and the Kyoto Prefectural Government commemorated the 1100th anniversary of the founding of Heian-kyō (平安京) which was the former name of Kyoto, in 794 by Emperor Kammu (桓武天皇 Kanmu-tennō?) (737 - 806). To inaugurate the first Jidai celebration in 1895, the city government built the Heian Shrine (平安神宮 Heian jingū?) to enshrine the spirit of Emperor Kanmu. To add meaning to the festival, it staged a costume procession representing people of each era in Kyoto history. In 1940, the local government decided that on top of honouring Emperor Kammu, the Jidai festival was also to be held in honour of Emperor Kōmei (孝明天皇 Kōmei-tennō) (July 22, 1831 - January 30, 1867) for his work in unifying the country, the power of the imperial court and the affirmation of Kyoto as the center of Japan at the decline of the Tokugawa Shogunate and the Edo Era.

The Jidai Matsuri begins in early morning with the mikoshi (portable shrines) brought out of the Old Imperial Palace so that people may pay their respects. The mikoshi represent emperors Kanmu and Kōmei, respectively. The five-hour, two-kilometer costume procession begins in the afternoon, with approximately 2,000 performers dressed as samurai, military figures, and common people, from the earliest eras to the Meiji era These are followed by Japanese women who are dressed in elaborate jūnihitoe (十二単衣 juunihitoe). And, finally, the mikoshi are carried from the palace and are accompanied by a costumed military band that is playing the gagaku. The procession ends at the Heian Shrine.”  

Jidai Matsuri Festival  ajpscs  (via: NYoshi on pinterest  HERE)


From Wiki:  ”The Jidai Matsuri (時代祭り) Festival of the Ages is a traditional Japanese festival (also called the matsuri) held on October 22 annually in Kyoto, Japan. It is one of Kyoto’s renowned three great festivals, with the other two being the Aoi Matsuri, held annually on May 15, and the Gion Matsuri, which is held annually from 17 to July 24. It is a festival enjoyed by people of all ages, participating in its historical reenactment parade dressed in authentic costumes representing various periods, and characters in Japanese feudal history.

Jidai Matsuri traces its roots with the relocation of the Japanese capital to Tokyo in 1868. This involved the relocation of the Emperor of Japan and his imperial family, the Imperial Palace and thousands of government officials and subjects to the city. Fearing for Kyoto’s loss in glory and interest by her people, the city government and the Kyoto Prefectural Government commemorated the 1100th anniversary of the founding of Heian-kyō (平安京) which was the former name of Kyoto, in 794 by Emperor Kammu (桓武天皇 Kanmu-tennō?) (737 - 806). To inaugurate the first Jidai celebration in 1895, the city government built the Heian Shrine (平安神宮 Heian jingū?) to enshrine the spirit of Emperor Kanmu. To add meaning to the festival, it staged a costume procession representing people of each era in Kyoto history. In 1940, the local government decided that on top of honouring Emperor Kammu, the Jidai festival was also to be held in honour of Emperor Kōmei (孝明天皇 Kōmei-tennō) (July 22, 1831 - January 30, 1867) for his work in unifying the country, the power of the imperial court and the affirmation of Kyoto as the center of Japan at the decline of the Tokugawa Shogunate and the Edo Era.

The Jidai Matsuri begins in early morning with the mikoshi (portable shrines) brought out of the Old Imperial Palace so that people may pay their respects. The mikoshi represent emperors Kanmu and Kōmei, respectively. The five-hour, two-kilometer costume procession begins in the afternoon, with approximately 2,000 performers dressed as samurai, military figures, and common people, from the earliest eras to the Meiji era These are followed by Japanese women who are dressed in elaborate jūnihitoe (十二単衣 juunihitoe). And, finally, the mikoshi are carried from the palace and are accompanied by a costumed military band that is playing the gagaku. The procession ends at the Heian Shrine.”  


Shirasagi-no-mai by ajpscs on Flickr  
The white heron (shirasagi) dancer at Senso-ji temple, Tokyo, Japan

Description for ajpscs:  ”The white heron (shirasagi) dance is one thousand years old. It is a religious rite to drive out the plague and purify the spirits on their passage to the next world. The white faces of the dancers signify innocence, purity and gentleness. People love the beautiful snow-white figure of heron and crane (tsuru) as a symbol of peace. According to religious belief pure white cranes inhabit the Isles of the Bless and their powerful wings are able to convey souls to the Western Paradise.

The Tale
Many old tales tell about white big birds which have been admired in Japan for their noble and graceful appearance. There is an old story about a lonely farmer who saved a crane’s life. The bird turned into a beautiful woman and became his wife. One day she asked the husband to build her a weaving room and promise never to peek inside. The wife wove beautiful thousand-crane patterned fabric from which the farmer could make a lot of money. They had been living happily but due to the wife’s diminishing health the farmer looked into the room and saw a crane weaving cloth by picking up beautiful feathers from her body. After becoming aware that the farmer had discovered her true identity the crane flew to heaven. photojapan.karigrohn.com/shirasagi/shirasagi no mai.htm.”  Image and text:  HERE (via: Annalisa Donà on pinterest   HERE)

Dashboard click box below for video of the festival and dance.

Shirasagi-no-mai by ajpscs on Flickr  

The white heron (shirasagi) dancer at Senso-ji temple, Tokyo, Japan

Description for ajpscs:  ”The white heron (shirasagi) dance is one thousand years old. It is a religious rite to drive out the plague and purify the spirits on their passage to the next world. The white faces of the dancers signify innocence, purity and gentleness. People love the beautiful snow-white figure of heron and crane (tsuru) as a symbol of peace. According to religious belief pure white cranes inhabit the Isles of the Bless and their powerful wings are able to convey souls to the Western Paradise.

The Tale

Many old tales tell about white big birds which have been admired in Japan for their noble and graceful appearance. There is an old story about a lonely farmer who saved a crane’s life. The bird turned into a beautiful woman and became his wife. One day she asked the husband to build her a weaving room and promise never to peek inside. The wife wove beautiful thousand-crane patterned fabric from which the farmer could make a lot of money. They had been living happily but due to the wife’s diminishing health the farmer looked into the room and saw a crane weaving cloth by picking up beautiful feathers from her body. After becoming aware that the farmer had discovered her true identity the crane flew to heaven. photojapan.karigrohn.com/shirasagi/shirasagi no mai.htm.”  Image and text:  HERE (via: Annalisa Donà on pinterest   HERE)


Dashboard click box below for video of the festival and dance.



The moon in all her immaculate purity hung in the sky, laughing at this world of dust. She congratulated me for my carefully considered maneuvers and invited me to share in her eternal solitude.
“
Shan Sa, Empress 
artemisdreaming:
Figurehead
Andreas Heumann  HERE

artemisdreaming:

Figurehead

Andreas Heumann  HERE


Full Moon
Andreas Heumann  HERE

Full Moon

Andreas Heumann  HERE


artemisdreaming:
Contrasting Sounds,  1924
Wassily Kandinsky
See archive for more

artemisdreaming:

Contrasting Sounds,  1924

Wassily Kandinsky

See archive for more


Masao Yamamoto (via: Jackson Fine Art)


Artemis:  I’ve posted a couple of these in the past.  I want them with this set though.  :)


心   kokoro
Japanese
Meaning:  heart, mind, mentality, emotions, feelings 

心   kokoro

Japanese

Meaning:  heart, mind, mentality, emotions, feelings 


artemisdreaming:
Photo: Ernest Hemingway 1923 passport (via: latimesblogs)

"If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast."
"We ate well and cheaply and drank well and cheaply and slept well and warm together and loved each other."
"But Paris was a very old city and we were young and nothing was simple there, not even poverty, nor sudden money, nor the moonlight, nor right and wrong nor the breathing of someone who lay beside you in the moonlight."
“When spring came, even the false spring, there were no problems except where to be happiest. The only thing that could spoil a day was people and if you could keep from making engagements, each day had no limits. People were always the limiters of happiness except for the very few that were as good as spring itself.” 
~Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast

Free ebook:  HERE
See archive for more Ernest Hemingway:  HERE

artemisdreaming:

Photo: Ernest Hemingway 1923 passport (via: latimesblogs)


"If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast."

"We ate well and cheaply and drank well and cheaply and slept well and warm together and loved each other."

"But Paris was a very old city and we were young and nothing was simple there, not even poverty, nor sudden money, nor the moonlight, nor right and wrong nor the breathing of someone who lay beside you in the moonlight."

“When spring came, even the false spring, there were no problems except where to be happiest. The only thing that could spoil a day was people and if you could keep from making engagements, each day had no limits. People were always the limiters of happiness except for the very few that were as good as spring itself.” 

~Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast


Free ebook:  HERE

See archive for more Ernest Hemingway:  HERE


Christian Waller  (Australia 02 Aug 1894 – 25 May 1954)

Title: The great breath; a book of seven designs

Year:  1932

Media categories:  Book, Print Materials used:  linocuts, black ink on tracing paper, tipped onto thick cream wove paper

Edition:  circa 30

Dimensions:  31.9 x 13.5 cm blockmark; 43.5 x 47.7 cm each sheet

Signature & date:  Not signed. Not dated.

Credit:  Gift of Klytie Pate 1975

Accession number:  250.1975

Copyright© Klytie W Pate

artgallery.nsw.gov.au


Description from Art Gallery of New South Wales (artgallery.nsw.gov.au): ”Christian Waller (née Yandell) was born at Castlemaine in 1894. Her family moved to Bendigo in 1908, and the following year at the age of fourteen she had an oil painting exhibited at the Bendigo Art Gallery. In 1910 she enrolled in the drawing class at the National Gallery School, Melbourne under Frederick McCubbin, and in 1912 in the painting school under Bernard Hall. She met her husband Napier Waller while a student; they married in 1915. She is best known as a book and magazine illustrator, printmaker and stained glass designer; her relief prints were principally made in the 1920s.

In 1929 the Wallers made a trip to Europe. Shortly after their return to Melbourne in 1930, they befriended Tatlock Miller, who owned a bookshop in Geelong; in the next few years he assisted with the production of a number of Christian Waller’s books and prints; she contributed to the initial editions of his literary and artistic magazine Manuscripts (published from November 1931). Miller established the Golden Arrow Press, the first release of which was The great breath, published in April 1932, priced at £3.3.0 each.

The production of ‘The great breath’ was entirely undertaken by Waller; all aspects from the cutting and printing of the linoblocks to the manufacture of the distinctive gold-painted emerald green cover was done by hand. She printed the blocks on her 1849 hand-press in her studio at Ivanhoe, each book taking about four days to make, hand-bound with green cord. Although it was intended to produce an edition of 150, it seems only about 30 were made, with some unbound impressions extant, usually untrimmed. Each consisted of a title page, colophon, contents page and seven linocut designs. The images were printed in solid black on white translucent tracing paper, trimmed and tipped onto the cream pages. The books were not numbered sequentially, but rather in relation to the numerology of the buyer - the Gallery’s copy was a gift of Klytie Pate, Waller’s niece.

Christian Waller was a Theosophist, beliefs which inform ‘The great breath’; in particular the Golden Dawn Movement. The central theme of the book is the evolution of the human race, based on the writings of Madame Blavatsky, the founder of the Theosophist movement, in particular her book ‘The secret doctrine’ (1888-97); the introduction stated ‘A book of seven designs, each design a symbolic rendering of the impulse behind an individual Root Race of the present world cycle’. The designs draw upon ancient Egyptian and Greek imagery, and symbolism from a number of sources including the Zodiac, as well as art deco and modernist design. ‘The lords of the flame’ is the third image in the book; ‘The lords of the flame made man a living soul in the Lemurian third race’.

Two pencil studies for The lords of the flame are in the National Gallery of Australia, with other studies for the book. There is a second copy of the book in the Gallery library (number 43). The engraved linoblock is in the collection of the Castlemaine Art Gallery. In 1978 Gryphon Books published a facsimile edition in slightly smaller format, limited to 600 copies, signed by Klytie Pate.

Hendrik Kolenberg and Anne Ryan, ‘Australian prints in the Gallery’s collection’, AGNSW, 1998”  Description and images: artgallery.nsw.gov.au


Artemis: Click through images for details.   For more about theosophy see wiki:  HERE  


No one saves us but ourselves, no one can and no one may. We ourselves must walk the path…


~Buddha
  Image:  Buddha  Justin Braithwaite


Artemis:  It is often quoted as a verse from the Dhammapada.  

It’s said to be a liberal translation of verse 165:   By oneself indeed is evil done and by oneself is one defiled; by oneself is evil not done and by oneself is one purified. Purity and impurity depend entirely on oneself; no one can purify another.
No one saves us but ourselves, no one can and no one may. We ourselves must walk the path…


~Buddha
  Image:  Buddha  Justin Braithwaite


Artemis:  It is often quoted as a verse from the Dhammapada.  
It’s said to be a liberal translation of verse 165:   By oneself indeed is evil done and by oneself is one defiled; by oneself is evil not done and by oneself is one purified. Purity and impurity depend entirely on oneself; no one can purify another.
artemisdreaming:
Marcel Duchamp Cast Alive - Marcel Duchamp and Alfred Wolkenberg, 1967 

artemisdreaming:

Marcel Duchamp Cast Alive - Marcel Duchamp and Alfred Wolkenberg, 1967 


Comtesse Sofia La belle de cadiz scarf   (via:  comtesse-sofia.com)


Rosie Lee Monument  

Mark Fleming  HERE
Artists statement:  ”The 2012 sporting calendar is a unique pinnacle in British sport and creativity. As an agency that prides itself on high-end sport art direction and creative concept development we wanted to celebrate this fact. We titled the project Monument. 
Working with photographer John Ross, we explored and developed a unique casting technique first utilised by John in his 2010 project Impressions. Identifying a link between Greek sculpture and the alabaster-like visuals produced from this method of casting, Monument documents, preserves and celebrates outstanding athletic achievement 
Representing 10 disciplines, athletes were cast to display the physical attributes specific to their sport – the swimmer’s shoulders, the fencer’s poise, the specific twist of the relay baton pass. Our attention to the minutiae of correct pose and form is in direct homage to the unwavering dedication of the athlete as they train to be the best in their field.”

Artemis:  See the high-res.