Clair de lune, Leeds City Art Gallery
Henri Le Sidaner
See archive for more:   HERE  

Clair de lune, Leeds City Art Gallery

Henri Le Sidaner

See archive for more:   HERE  

Henri Le Sidaner
See archive for more:   HERE 

Henri Le Sidaner

See archive for more:   HERE 

The Window at Croisic, 1924, Private Collection
Henri Le Sidaner
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The Window at Croisic, 1924, Private Collection

Henri Le Sidaner

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La maison sous l’église, hiver, (House Near the Church, Winter), 1934
Henri Le Sidaner
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La maison sous l’église, hiver, (House Near the Church, Winter), 1934

Henri Le Sidaner

See archive for more:  HERE 

Rocky Inlets by Moonlight, 1928,  Burrell Collection 
Henri Le Sidaner
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Rocky Inlets by Moonlight, 1928,  Burrell Collection 

Henri Le Sidaner

See archive for more:  HERE 

 

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Head of Christ detail

Gian Giacomo Caprotti  (1480 - 1524)
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Artemis:  This is the only painting signed by Gian Giacomo Caprotti. There’s controversy surrounding it.  It is believed by some to be a da Vinci and there is speculation that Caprotti was the model.
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Description from Wiki  HERE:  ”Gian Giacomo Caprotti da Oreno, better known as Salaì (“The Devil”, lit. “The little unclean one”) (1480 – before 10 March 1524), was an Italian artist and pupil of Leonardo da Vinci from 1490 to 1518. Salai entered Leonardo’s household at the age of 10. He created paintings under the name of Andrea Salai. He was described as one of Leonardo’s students and lifelong servant and is the presumed model for Leonardo’s paintings St. John the Baptist and Bacchus.
Salaì was born in 1480 as son of Pietro di Giovanni, a tenant of Leonardo’s vineyard near the Porta Vercellina, Milan. He joined Leonardo’s household at the age of ten as an assistant. Vasari describes Salaì as “a graceful and beautiful youth with curly hair, in which Leonardo greatly delighted”. Although Leonardo described him as “a liar, a thief, stubborn and a glutton” and he stole from Leonardo on at least five occasions, he kept him in his household for more than 25 years, in which he trained as an artist. Salaì became a capable, although not very impressive, painter,  who created several works, including the Monna Vanna, a nude version of the Mona Lisa which may be based on a lost nude by Leonardo.  Leonardo is thought to have used Salaì as the model for several of his works, specifically St. John the Baptist.
During Leonardo’s second stay in Milan, he took another young pupil, Francesco Melzi. Unlike Salaì, Francesco was a son of a nobleman. When Leonardo traveled to Rome in 1513 and to France in 1516, Salai and Melzi both accompanied him. As an adult, Melzi became secretary and main assistant of Leonardo, and undertook to prepare Leonardo’s writings for publication. Vasari says that Melzi “at the time of Leonardo was a very beautiful and very much loved young man”. In France, Francesco Melzi was greeted as “Italian gentleman living with master Leonardo” and granted donation of 400 ecus, while Salai, already over 40 years old, was described as “servant” and granted a one time donation of 100 ecus. Salaì left Leonardo and France in 1518. He later returned to Milan to work on Leonardo’s vineyard, previously worked by Salai’s father, and which was granted to him by Leonardo’s will.
[[MORE]]
Salai married Bianca Coldiroli d’Annono on June 14, 1523 at the age of 43. Salai died in 1524 as a result of a wound received from crossbow in a duel and was buried in Milan on 10 March 1524.
Salaì’s sexuality
A number of drawings among the works of Leonardo and his pupils make reference to Salai’s sexuality. There is a drawing modelled on Leonardo’s painting John the Baptist and called The Angel Incarnate, of a young man nude with an erect phallus, and appearing to represent Salai. The face of the figure is closer to Salai’s copy of Leonardo’s painting, than to the original John the Baptist in the Louvre. It may have been drawn by Salai himself. A folio by Leonardo includes a page of drawings by a hand other than Leonardo’s, one of which is a crudely drawn sketch depicting an anus, identified as “Salaì’s bum”, pursued by penises on legs. It has been suggested, as early as the 16th century, that there was a sexually intimate relationship between Leonardo and Salai, but this cannot be known for certain.[citation needed]
Speculation
A group of Italian researchers has claimed that Salaì was the model for the Mona Lisa, noting the similarity in some of the facial features, particularly the nose and mouth, to those in which Salai is thought to have been the model. These claims have been disputed by the Louvre. Also, it is commonly believed that Leonardo’s death in 1519, Salaì inherited several paintings including the Mona Lisa as well as half a vineyard. Through his estate, many of those works, notably the Mona Lisa, passed into the possession of Francis I of France. However, all personal belongings, paintings, drawings and notes were granted to Francesco Melzi by Leonardo’s will.[citation needed] A theory suggests paintings in Salai’s possession were merely copies, done by Giacomo himself. As a strong argument, a copy of Mona Lisa in Prado, Madrid, few copies of Virgin and St Anne and a copy of St John the Baptist in Milan are ascribed to Salai.[citation needed]
In popular fiction
Salaì is a principal character in the novel Cenacolo[8] by Joseph Orbi.
In Paul McAuley’s novel Pasquale’s Angel set in an alternate Italian Renaissance, Salai is the main antagonist.
DC Comics’ 1995 Vertigo series Chiaroscuro: The Private Lives of Leonardo da Vinci (later published as a graphic novel) tells a speculative story of a love affair between Leonardo and Salai.”  via:  Wiki HERE

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Head of Christ detail

Gian Giacomo Caprotti  (1480 - 1524)

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Artemis:  This is the only painting signed by Gian Giacomo Caprotti. There’s controversy surrounding it.  It is believed by some to be a da Vinci and there is speculation that Caprotti was the model.

.

Description from Wiki  HERE:  ”Gian Giacomo Caprotti da Oreno, better known as Salaì (“The Devil”, lit. “The little unclean one”) (1480 – before 10 March 1524), was an Italian artist and pupil of Leonardo da Vinci from 1490 to 1518. Salai entered Leonardo’s household at the age of 10. He created paintings under the name of Andrea Salai. He was described as one of Leonardo’s students and lifelong servant and is the presumed model for Leonardo’s paintings St. John the Baptist and Bacchus.

Salaì was born in 1480 as son of Pietro di Giovanni, a tenant of Leonardo’s vineyard near the Porta Vercellina, Milan. He joined Leonardo’s household at the age of ten as an assistant. Vasari describes Salaì as “a graceful and beautiful youth with curly hair, in which Leonardo greatly delighted”. Although Leonardo described him as “a liar, a thief, stubborn and a glutton” and he stole from Leonardo on at least five occasions, he kept him in his household for more than 25 years, in which he trained as an artist. Salaì became a capable, although not very impressive, painter,  who created several works, including the Monna Vanna, a nude version of the Mona Lisa which may be based on a lost nude by Leonardo.  Leonardo is thought to have used Salaì as the model for several of his works, specifically St. John the Baptist.

During Leonardo’s second stay in Milan, he took another young pupil, Francesco Melzi. Unlike Salaì, Francesco was a son of a nobleman. When Leonardo traveled to Rome in 1513 and to France in 1516, Salai and Melzi both accompanied him. As an adult, Melzi became secretary and main assistant of Leonardo, and undertook to prepare Leonardo’s writings for publication. Vasari says that Melzi “at the time of Leonardo was a very beautiful and very much loved young man”. In France, Francesco Melzi was greeted as “Italian gentleman living with master Leonardo” and granted donation of 400 ecus, while Salai, already over 40 years old, was described as “servant” and granted a one time donation of 100 ecus. Salaì left Leonardo and France in 1518. He later returned to Milan to work on Leonardo’s vineyard, previously worked by Salai’s father, and which was granted to him by Leonardo’s will.

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Untitled, Essays On Love
Martín Fernández Alicia

Untitled, Essays On Love

Martín Fernández Alicia

Untitled, Essays On Love
Martín Fernández Alicia

Untitled, Essays On Love

Martín Fernández Alicia

Hathor Holding Nefertari’s Hand

Image and description from touregypt.net:  ”In an extremely delicate gesture, Hathor the Western goddess holds the hand of the dead queen. Around her arms, Nefertari wears a piece of jewelry made up of beads and the udjat-eye, symbol of restored wholeness. This is detail of the northern face of the northwest pillar of the sarcophagus room at Nefertari’s tomb.”

Hathor Holding Nefertari’s Hand

Image and description from touregypt.net:  ”In an extremely delicate gesture, Hathor the Western goddess holds the hand of the dead queen. Around her arms, Nefertari wears a piece of jewelry made up of beads and the udjat-eye, symbol of restored wholeness. This is detail of the northern face of the northwest pillar of the sarcophagus room at Nefertari’s tomb.”

Arched wooden harp

From the tomb of Any, Thebes, Egypt
New Kingdom, 1550-1069 BC
The British Museum

Model ladle-shaped harp made of wood, inlaid with bone and faience
Length: 97.200 cm (soundbox and neck)
Width: 12.500 cm (soundbox)
Diameter: 9.200 cm
EA 24564

Ancient Egypt and Sudan

Image and description from The British Museum:  ”Harps were often shown in banquet scenes, decorating the walls of tombs. The harp is usually depicted on a stand and such scenes sometimes included the lute and double oboe, as well singers and dancers. Analysis of these images has shown that the harp was probably played by plucking two strings at the same time. The pitch and semitone interval between strings made it ideal for accompanying songs. Most of the songs performed at a banquet were dedicated to a deity, usually Amun. He was the most important god at Thebes, and the most important annual feast of the Theban necropolis was celebrated in honour of this deity.

The instruments were usually highly decorated, this example being no exception. The sound box has the head of deity wearing a double crown and striped head-dress at its end. The underside and lower part of the harp’s neck are decorated with a floral pattern. The falcon head at the top of the neck is characteristic of this type of harp, which usually had between nine and eleven strings, rather than the five shown in this model.

Instruments of this shape were usually played by male solo artists.

R.D. Anderson, Catalogue of Egyptian Antiqu-2 (London, The British Museum Press, 1976)”

Arched wooden harp

From the tomb of Any, Thebes, Egypt

New Kingdom, 1550-1069 BC

The British Museum

Model ladle-shaped harp made of wood, inlaid with bone and faience

Length: 97.200 cm (soundbox and neck)

Width: 12.500 cm (soundbox)

Diameter: 9.200 cm

EA 24564

Ancient Egypt and Sudan

Image and description from The British Museum:  ”Harps were often shown in banquet scenes, decorating the walls of tombs. The harp is usually depicted on a stand and such scenes sometimes included the lute and double oboe, as well singers and dancers. Analysis of these images has shown that the harp was probably played by plucking two strings at the same time. The pitch and semitone interval between strings made it ideal for accompanying songs. Most of the songs performed at a banquet were dedicated to a deity, usually Amun. He was the most important god at Thebes, and the most important annual feast of the Theban necropolis was celebrated in honour of this deity.

The instruments were usually highly decorated, this example being no exception. The sound box has the head of deity wearing a double crown and striped head-dress at its end. The underside and lower part of the harp’s neck are decorated with a floral pattern. The falcon head at the top of the neck is characteristic of this type of harp, which usually had between nine and eleven strings, rather than the five shown in this model.

Instruments of this shape were usually played by male solo artists.

R.D. Anderson, Catalogue of Egyptian Antiqu-2 (London, The British Museum Press, 1976)”

artemisvoice:
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Dashboard: Click box below for video.
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Silence (via: youtube | soedwards111)
Chet Baker (tp) Enrico Pieranunzi (pf) Charlie Haden (b) Billy Higgins (ds ) Recorded in Rome, Italy, November 11 & 12, 1987
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artemisvoice:

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Dashboard: Click box below for video.

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Silence (via: youtube | soedwards111)

Chet Baker (tp) Enrico Pieranunzi (pf) Charlie Haden (b) Billy Higgins (ds ) Recorded in Rome, Italy, November 11 & 12, 1987

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theatlantic:
R.I.P. Philip Seymour Hoffman, the Greatest Actor of His Generation  Read more. [Image: Sony Pictures Classics]
Close look at Picasso’s The Bird Cage
 Édouard Boubat 

Close look at Picasso’s The Bird Cage

 Édouard Boubat 

Paris, France 1982   
Édouard Boubat 

Paris, France 1982   

Édouard Boubat 

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He tried to weigh his soul to see if it was a poet’s soul. Melancholy was the dominant note of his temperament, he thought, but it was a melancholy tempered by recurrences of faith and resignation and simple joy. If he could give expression to it in a book of poems perhaps men would listen. 
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~James Joyce,  A Little Cloud
   Image:  James Joyce, 1904, age 27 (via:  folha.uol.com)

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He tried to weigh his soul to see if it was a poet’s soul. Melancholy was the dominant note of his temperament, he thought, but it was a melancholy tempered by recurrences of faith and resignation and simple joy. If he could give expression to it in a book of poems perhaps men would listen. 

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~James Joyce,  A Little Cloud

   Image:  James Joyce, 1904, age 27 (via:  folha.uol.com)