wolfstargazing:

For those who might have not have seen this yet, this is Yuzuru Hanyu’s skate for Japan last night at the 2014 Olympics.   He scored a 97.98 on this skate, and currently sits in 1st place!

This is one of the best skates I’ve ever seen and I had to share!  Just……………………. wonderful.   :)

白梅に / 明くるよばかりと / なりにけり 
It has come to pass Each night dawns eternally into White plum blossoms
~Yosa Buson
Image:  Katsushika Hokusa Plum Blossom and the Moon

白梅に / 明くるよばかりと / なりにけり 

It has come to pass
Each night dawns eternally into
White plum blossoms

~Yosa Buson

Image:  Katsushika Hokusa Plum Blossom and the Moon

artemisvoice:
.
Image: Billie Holiday at the Tiffany Club, Los Angeles, 1951 (via: kingkong82.wix.com)
Video below:  Billie Holiday - Strange Fruit  (via: youtube | MonsieurBaudelaire)
.
Southern trees bear a strange fruit,
Blood on the leaves and blood at the root,
Black bodies swinging in the southern breeze,
Strange fruit hanging from the poplar trees.
Pastoral scene of the gallant south,
The bulging eyes and the twisted mouth,
Scent of magnolias, sweet and fresh,
Then the sudden smell of burning flesh.
Here is fruit for the crows to pluck,
For the rain to gather, for the wind to suck,
For the sun to rot, for the trees to drop,
Here is a strange and bitter crop.
.
From Wiki (HERE) :  ”Strange Fruit” is a song performed most famously by Billie Holiday, who first sang and recorded it in 1939. Written by the teacher Abel Meeropol as a poem, it exposed American racism, particularly the lynching of African Americans. Such lynchings had occurred chiefly in the South but also in other regions of the United States. Meeropol set it to music and with his wife and the singer Laura Duncan, performed it as a protest song in New York venues, including Madison Square Garden.
The song has been covered by artists, as well as inspiring novels, other poems and other creative works. In 1978 Holiday’s version of the song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. It was also included in the list of Songs of the Century, by the Recording Industry of America and the National Endowment for the Arts.
Poem and song
The photograph that was cited by the songwriter as the inspiration for the song: Thomas Shipp and Abram Smith, August 7, 1930.
"Strange Fruit" is a poem written by Abel Meeropol, a white, Jewish high school teacher from the Bronx and a member of the Communist Party, as a protest against lynchings. He sometimes published under the pen name Lewis Allan, after two sons who were stillborn.
The lyrics, very similar to those of Théodore de Banville’s poem “Le Verger Du Roi Louis” written seventy years before, are under copyright but have been republished in full in an academic journal, with permission. In the poem, Meeropol expressed his horror at lynchings. He had seen Lawrence Beitler’s photograph of the 1930 lynching of Thomas Shipp and Abram Smith in Marion, Indiana. He published the poem under the title “Bitter Fruit” in 1937 in The New York Teacher, a union magazine. Though Meeropol had often asked others (notably Earl Robinson) to set his poems to music, he set “Strange Fruit” to music himself and the piece gained a certain success as a protest song in and around New York. Meeropol, his wife, and black vocalist Laura Duncan performed it at Madison Square Garden.
Billie Holiday’s performances and recordings
Barney Josephson, the founder of Cafe Society in Greenwich Village, New York’s first integrated nightclub, heard the song and introduced it to Billie Holiday. Other reports say that Robert Gordon, who was directing Billie Holiday’s show at Cafe Society, heard the song at Madison Square Garden and introduced it to her. Holiday first performed the song at Cafe Society in 1939. She said that singing it made her fearful of retaliation but, because its imagery reminded her of her father, she continued to sing the piece making it a regular part of her live performances. Because of the poignancy of the song, Josephson drew up some rules: Holiday would close with it; the waiters would stop all service in advance; the room would be in darkness except for a spotlight on Holiday’s face; and there would be no encore. During the musical introduction, Holiday would stand with her eyes closed, as if she were evoking a prayer.
Holiday approached her recording label, Columbia, about the song, but the company feared reaction by record retailers in the South, as well as negative reaction from affiliates of its co-owned radio network, CBS.  Even John Hammond, Holiday’s producer, refused so she turned to friend Milt Gabler, whose Commodore label produced alternative jazz. Holiday sang “Strange Fruit” for him a cappella, and moved him to tears. Columbia allowed Holiday a one-session release from her contract in order to record it and Frankie Newton’s eight-piece Cafe Society Band was used for the session. Because he was worried that the song was too short, Gabler asked pianist Sonny White to improvise an introduction so that Holiday only starts singing after 70 seconds. Gabler worked out a special arrangement with Vocalion Records to record and distribute the song.
She recorded two major sessions at Commodore, one in 1939 and one in 1944. The song was highly regarded and the 1939 record sold a million copies, in time becoming Holiday’s biggest-selling record.
In her autobiography, Lady Sings the Blues, Holiday suggested that she, together with Meeropol, her accompanist Sonny White, and arranger Danny Mendelsohn, set the poem to music. The writers David Margolick and Hilton Als dismissed that claim in their work, Strange Fruit: The Biography of a Song writing that hers was “an account that may set a record for most misinformation per column inch”. When challenged, Holiday—whose autobiography had been ghostwritten by William Dufty—claimed, “I ain’t never read that book.”  HERE
.
Dashboard:  Click box below for video

artemisvoice:

.

Image: Billie Holiday at the Tiffany Club, Los Angeles, 1951 (via: kingkong82.wix.com)

Video below:  Billie Holiday - Strange Fruit  (via: youtube | MonsieurBaudelaire)

.

Southern trees bear a strange fruit,

Blood on the leaves and blood at the root,

Black bodies swinging in the southern breeze,

Strange fruit hanging from the poplar trees.

Pastoral scene of the gallant south,

The bulging eyes and the twisted mouth,

Scent of magnolias, sweet and fresh,

Then the sudden smell of burning flesh.

Here is fruit for the crows to pluck,

For the rain to gather, for the wind to suck,

For the sun to rot, for the trees to drop,

Here is a strange and bitter crop.

.

From Wiki (HERE) :  ”Strange Fruit” is a song performed most famously by Billie Holiday, who first sang and recorded it in 1939. Written by the teacher Abel Meeropol as a poem, it exposed American racism, particularly the lynching of African Americans. Such lynchings had occurred chiefly in the South but also in other regions of the United States. Meeropol set it to music and with his wife and the singer Laura Duncan, performed it as a protest song in New York venues, including Madison Square Garden.

The song has been covered by artists, as well as inspiring novels, other poems and other creative works. In 1978 Holiday’s version of the song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. It was also included in the list of Songs of the Century, by the Recording Industry of America and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Poem and song

The photograph that was cited by the songwriter as the inspiration for the song: Thomas Shipp and Abram Smith, August 7, 1930.

"Strange Fruit" is a poem written by Abel Meeropol, a white, Jewish high school teacher from the Bronx and a member of the Communist Party, as a protest against lynchings. He sometimes published under the pen name Lewis Allan, after two sons who were stillborn.

The lyrics, very similar to those of Théodore de Banville’s poem “Le Verger Du Roi Louis” written seventy years before, are under copyright but have been republished in full in an academic journal, with permission. In the poem, Meeropol expressed his horror at lynchings. He had seen Lawrence Beitler’s photograph of the 1930 lynching of Thomas Shipp and Abram Smith in Marion, Indiana. He published the poem under the title “Bitter Fruit” in 1937 in The New York Teacher, a union magazine. Though Meeropol had often asked others (notably Earl Robinson) to set his poems to music, he set “Strange Fruit” to music himself and the piece gained a certain success as a protest song in and around New York. Meeropol, his wife, and black vocalist Laura Duncan performed it at Madison Square Garden.

Billie Holiday’s performances and recordings

Barney Josephson, the founder of Cafe Society in Greenwich Village, New York’s first integrated nightclub, heard the song and introduced it to Billie Holiday. Other reports say that Robert Gordon, who was directing Billie Holiday’s show at Cafe Society, heard the song at Madison Square Garden and introduced it to her. Holiday first performed the song at Cafe Society in 1939. She said that singing it made her fearful of retaliation but, because its imagery reminded her of her father, she continued to sing the piece making it a regular part of her live performances. Because of the poignancy of the song, Josephson drew up some rules: Holiday would close with it; the waiters would stop all service in advance; the room would be in darkness except for a spotlight on Holiday’s face; and there would be no encore. During the musical introduction, Holiday would stand with her eyes closed, as if she were evoking a prayer.

Holiday approached her recording label, Columbia, about the song, but the company feared reaction by record retailers in the South, as well as negative reaction from affiliates of its co-owned radio network, CBS.  Even John Hammond, Holiday’s producer, refused so she turned to friend Milt Gabler, whose Commodore label produced alternative jazz. Holiday sang “Strange Fruit” for him a cappella, and moved him to tears. Columbia allowed Holiday a one-session release from her contract in order to record it and Frankie Newton’s eight-piece Cafe Society Band was used for the session. Because he was worried that the song was too short, Gabler asked pianist Sonny White to improvise an introduction so that Holiday only starts singing after 70 seconds. Gabler worked out a special arrangement with Vocalion Records to record and distribute the song.

She recorded two major sessions at Commodore, one in 1939 and one in 1944. The song was highly regarded and the 1939 record sold a million copies, in time becoming Holiday’s biggest-selling record.

In her autobiography, Lady Sings the Blues, Holiday suggested that she, together with Meeropol, her accompanist Sonny White, and arranger Danny Mendelsohn, set the poem to music. The writers David Margolick and Hilton Als dismissed that claim in their work, Strange Fruit: The Biography of a Song writing that hers was “an account that may set a record for most misinformation per column inch”. When challenged, Holiday—whose autobiography had been ghostwritten by William Dufty—claimed, “I ain’t never read that book.”  HERE

.

Dashboard:  Click box below for video

Photographer on Tumblr: blacksmithseye 
Artemis:  See more HERE.  Beautiful photography and an all around nice person.  :)
Also check out  Blacksmith’s Wider Eye for travel pictures and professional work.  Check out the archives on both blogs. :)  

Photographer on Tumblr: blacksmithseye 

Artemis:  See more HERE.  Beautiful photography and an all around nice person.  :)

Also check out  Blacksmith’s Wider Eye for travel pictures and professional work.  Check out the archives on both blogs. :)  

blacksmithswidereye:
Approximately 8,000 years ago a man carved this. The giraffe is life size.
.
Artemis:  Amazing Photo.  :)   Photographer on Tumblr: Blacksmith’s Wider Eye  
See more HERE.  Beautiful photography and an all around nice person.  :)
Also blacksmithseye for photography of the village of Dent, in the Yorkshire Dales.  Check out the archives on both blogs. :)  

blacksmithswidereye:

Approximately 8,000 years ago a man carved this. The giraffe is life size.

.

Artemis:  Amazing Photo.  :)   Photographer on Tumblr: Blacksmith’s Wider Eye  

See more HERE.  Beautiful photography and an all around nice person.  :)

Also blacksmithseye for photography of the village of Dent, in the Yorkshire Dales.  Check out the archives on both blogs. :)  

Being solitary is being alone well: being alone luxuriously immersed in doings of your own choice, aware of the fullness of your won presence rather than of the absence of others. Because solitude is an achievement.
~Alice Koller
Image:  Bogdan Luta  HERE (via:  pinterest)

Being solitary is being alone well: being alone luxuriously immersed in doings of your own choice, aware of the fullness of your won presence rather than of the absence of others. Because solitude is an achievement.

~Alice Koller

Image:  Bogdan Luta  HERE (via:  pinterest)

Paris, 1934 Gamma-Keystone (via:samotako.wordpress)

Paris, 1934 Gamma-Keystone (via:samotako.wordpress)

.
Once I pass’d through a populous city imprinting my brain for future use with its shows, architecture, customs, traditions, Yet now of all that city I remember only a woman I casually met there who detain’d me for love of me, Day by day and night by night we were together-all else has long been forgotten by me, I remember I say only that woman who passionately clung to me, Again we wander, we love, we separate again, Again she holds me by the hand, I must not go, I see her close beside me with silent lips sad and tremulous.
.
Walt Whitman, Once I Pass’d Through a Populous City, Leaves of Grass,  1891
Image:  onequalitythefinest.com

.

Once I pass’d through a populous city imprinting my brain for future 
use with its shows, architecture, customs, traditions, 
Yet now of all that city I remember only a woman I casually met 
there who detain’d me for love of me, 
Day by day and night by night we were together-all else has long 
been forgotten by me, 
I remember I say only that woman who passionately clung to me, 
Again we wander, we love, we separate again, 
Again she holds me by the hand, I must not go, 
I see her close beside me with silent lips sad and tremulous.

.

Walt Whitman, Once I Pass’d Through a Populous City, Leaves of Grass,  1891

Image:  onequalitythefinest.com

Clair de lune, Leeds City Art Gallery
Henri Le Sidaner
See archive for more:   HERE  

Clair de lune, Leeds City Art Gallery

Henri Le Sidaner

See archive for more:   HERE  

Henri Le Sidaner
See archive for more:   HERE 

Henri Le Sidaner

See archive for more:   HERE 

The Window at Croisic, 1924, Private Collection
Henri Le Sidaner
See archive for more:   HERE    

The Window at Croisic, 1924, Private Collection

Henri Le Sidaner

See archive for more:   HERE    

La maison sous l’église, hiver, (House Near the Church, Winter), 1934
Henri Le Sidaner
See archive for more:  HERE 

La maison sous l’église, hiver, (House Near the Church, Winter), 1934

Henri Le Sidaner

See archive for more:  HERE 

Rocky Inlets by Moonlight, 1928,  Burrell Collection 
Henri Le Sidaner
See archive for more:  HERE 
 

Rocky Inlets by Moonlight, 1928,  Burrell Collection 

Henri Le Sidaner

See archive for more:  HERE 

 

.
Head of Christ detail

Gian Giacomo Caprotti  (1480 - 1524)
.
Artemis:  This is the only painting signed by Gian Giacomo Caprotti. There’s controversy surrounding it.  It is believed by some to be a da Vinci and there is speculation that Caprotti was the model.
.


Description from Wiki  HERE:  ”Gian Giacomo Caprotti da Oreno, better known as Salaì (“The Devil”, lit. “The little unclean one”) (1480 – before 10 March 1524), was an Italian artist and pupil of Leonardo da Vinci from 1490 to 1518. Salai entered Leonardo’s household at the age of 10. He created paintings under the name of Andrea Salai. He was described as one of Leonardo’s students and lifelong servant and is the presumed model for Leonardo’s paintings St. John the Baptist and Bacchus.
Salaì was born in 1480 as son of Pietro di Giovanni, a tenant of Leonardo’s vineyard near the Porta Vercellina, Milan. He joined Leonardo’s household at the age of ten as an assistant. Vasari describes Salaì as “a graceful and beautiful youth with curly hair, in which Leonardo greatly delighted”. Although Leonardo described him as “a liar, a thief, stubborn and a glutton” and he stole from Leonardo on at least five occasions, he kept him in his household for more than 25 years, in which he trained as an artist. Salaì became a capable, although not very impressive, painter,  who created several works, including the Monna Vanna, a nude version of the Mona Lisa which may be based on a lost nude by Leonardo.  Leonardo is thought to have used Salaì as the model for several of his works, specifically St. John the Baptist.
During Leonardo’s second stay in Milan, he took another young pupil, Francesco Melzi. Unlike Salaì, Francesco was a son of a nobleman. When Leonardo traveled to Rome in 1513 and to France in 1516, Salai and Melzi both accompanied him. As an adult, Melzi became secretary and main assistant of Leonardo, and undertook to prepare Leonardo’s writings for publication. Vasari says that Melzi “at the time of Leonardo was a very beautiful and very much loved young man”. In France, Francesco Melzi was greeted as “Italian gentleman living with master Leonardo” and granted donation of 400 ecus, while Salai, already over 40 years old, was described as “servant” and granted a one time donation of 100 ecus. Salaì left Leonardo and France in 1518. He later returned to Milan to work on Leonardo’s vineyard, previously worked by Salai’s father, and which was granted to him by Leonardo’s will.
[[MORE]]
Salai married Bianca Coldiroli d’Annono on June 14, 1523 at the age of 43. Salai died in 1524 as a result of a wound received from crossbow in a duel and was buried in Milan on 10 March 1524.
Salaì’s sexuality
A number of drawings among the works of Leonardo and his pupils make reference to Salai’s sexuality. There is a drawing modelled on Leonardo’s painting John the Baptist and called The Angel Incarnate, of a young man nude with an erect phallus, and appearing to represent Salai. The face of the figure is closer to Salai’s copy of Leonardo’s painting, than to the original John the Baptist in the Louvre. It may have been drawn by Salai himself. A folio by Leonardo includes a page of drawings by a hand other than Leonardo’s, one of which is a crudely drawn sketch depicting an anus, identified as “Salaì’s bum”, pursued by penises on legs. It has been suggested, as early as the 16th century, that there was a sexually intimate relationship between Leonardo and Salai, but this cannot be known for certain.[citation needed]
Speculation
A group of Italian researchers has claimed that Salaì was the model for the Mona Lisa, noting the similarity in some of the facial features, particularly the nose and mouth, to those in which Salai is thought to have been the model. These claims have been disputed by the Louvre. Also, it is commonly believed that Leonardo’s death in 1519, Salaì inherited several paintings including the Mona Lisa as well as half a vineyard. Through his estate, many of those works, notably the Mona Lisa, passed into the possession of Francis I of France. However, all personal belongings, paintings, drawings and notes were granted to Francesco Melzi by Leonardo’s will.[citation needed] A theory suggests paintings in Salai’s possession were merely copies, done by Giacomo himself. As a strong argument, a copy of Mona Lisa in Prado, Madrid, few copies of Virgin and St Anne and a copy of St John the Baptist in Milan are ascribed to Salai.[citation needed]
In popular fiction
Salaì is a principal character in the novel Cenacolo[8] by Joseph Orbi.
In Paul McAuley’s novel Pasquale’s Angel set in an alternate Italian Renaissance, Salai is the main antagonist.
DC Comics’ 1995 Vertigo series Chiaroscuro: The Private Lives of Leonardo da Vinci (later published as a graphic novel) tells a speculative story of a love affair between Leonardo and Salai.”  via:  Wiki HERE

.

Head of Christ detail

Gian Giacomo Caprotti  (1480 - 1524)

.

Artemis:  This is the only painting signed by Gian Giacomo Caprotti. There’s controversy surrounding it.  It is believed by some to be a da Vinci and there is speculation that Caprotti was the model.

.

Description from Wiki  HERE:  ”Gian Giacomo Caprotti da Oreno, better known as Salaì (“The Devil”, lit. “The little unclean one”) (1480 – before 10 March 1524), was an Italian artist and pupil of Leonardo da Vinci from 1490 to 1518. Salai entered Leonardo’s household at the age of 10. He created paintings under the name of Andrea Salai. He was described as one of Leonardo’s students and lifelong servant and is the presumed model for Leonardo’s paintings St. John the Baptist and Bacchus.

Salaì was born in 1480 as son of Pietro di Giovanni, a tenant of Leonardo’s vineyard near the Porta Vercellina, Milan. He joined Leonardo’s household at the age of ten as an assistant. Vasari describes Salaì as “a graceful and beautiful youth with curly hair, in which Leonardo greatly delighted”. Although Leonardo described him as “a liar, a thief, stubborn and a glutton” and he stole from Leonardo on at least five occasions, he kept him in his household for more than 25 years, in which he trained as an artist. Salaì became a capable, although not very impressive, painter,  who created several works, including the Monna Vanna, a nude version of the Mona Lisa which may be based on a lost nude by Leonardo.  Leonardo is thought to have used Salaì as the model for several of his works, specifically St. John the Baptist.

During Leonardo’s second stay in Milan, he took another young pupil, Francesco Melzi. Unlike Salaì, Francesco was a son of a nobleman. When Leonardo traveled to Rome in 1513 and to France in 1516, Salai and Melzi both accompanied him. As an adult, Melzi became secretary and main assistant of Leonardo, and undertook to prepare Leonardo’s writings for publication. Vasari says that Melzi “at the time of Leonardo was a very beautiful and very much loved young man”. In France, Francesco Melzi was greeted as “Italian gentleman living with master Leonardo” and granted donation of 400 ecus, while Salai, already over 40 years old, was described as “servant” and granted a one time donation of 100 ecus. Salaì left Leonardo and France in 1518. He later returned to Milan to work on Leonardo’s vineyard, previously worked by Salai’s father, and which was granted to him by Leonardo’s will.

Read More

Untitled, Essays On Love
Martín Fernández Alicia

Untitled, Essays On Love

Martín Fernández Alicia