Mahatma Gandhi’s worldly possessions 
They were sold at auction in 2009.  :(    
You can read more about it HERE.

Mahatma Gandhi’s worldly possessions 

They were sold at auction in 2009.  :(    

You can read more about it HERE.

Mahatma Gandhi’s worldly possessions   (via:  Les Abeilles | flickr)
They were sold at auction in 2009.  :(    
You can read more about it HERE.

Mahatma Gandhi’s worldly possessions   (via:  Les Abeilles | flickr)

They were sold at auction in 2009.  :(    

You can read more about it HERE.

Le chat 
Jean Cocteau

For more Jean Cocteau cat drawings, other art, phototography and interviews see archive:  HERE

Le chat

Jean Cocteau

For more Jean Cocteau cat drawings, other art, phototography and interviews see archive:  HERE

Jean Marais at his easel (Saint Jean Cap Ferrat), 1950
Jean Cocteau
For more Jean Cocteau art, phototography and interviews see archive:  HERE

Jean Marais at his easel (Saint Jean Cap Ferrat), 1950

Jean Cocteau

For more Jean Cocteau art, phototography and interviews see archive:  HERE

Illico, 2011, gilded silver  (via: frieze.com)
John Armleder 


Illico, 2011, gilded silver  (via: frieze.com)

John Armleder 

April Magnolia by Oriana.Italy (via: pinterest | tickled pink | Michelle DuPuis
.

Artemis:  Spring.  :)  

April Magnolia by Oriana.Italy (via: pinterest | tickled pink | Michelle DuPuis

.

Artemis:  Spring.  :)  

3 year old is very happy to dance  (via: dramafever | youtube)

He’s happy and wants to make others happy.  So cute.  :)  Watch towards the end when he talks to the judges.  

Tea, 1975,  Arab Museum of Modern Art (via: londonmagazine.org)
Neziha Salim (I1923 - 2008)

Tea, 1975,  Arab Museum of Modern Art (via: londonmagazine.org)

Neziha Salim (I1923 - 2008)

Julia Iwo HERE 

Julia Iwo HERE 

Julia Iwo HERE
Julia Iwo HERE
Hedy Lamarr

Hedy Lamarr

hoodoothatvoodoo:

A young girl takes part in a Baltimore area Easter egg hunt in 1988

hoodoothatvoodoo:

A young girl takes part in a Baltimore area Easter egg hunt in 1988

Above:  Hakuin Ekaku, 1685-1768, Two Blind Men on a Bridge. Ink on paper, 11 x 33 in. Man’yo-an Collection, Japan Society, NY
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Both the health of our bodiesand the fleeting world outside usare like the blind men’sround log bridge – a mind/heartthat can cross over is the best guide
~Hakuin Ekaku
.
From Wiki:  “Hakuin Ekaku (白隠 慧鶴, January 19, 1686 - January 18, 1768) was one of the most influential figures in Japanese Zen Buddhism. He revived the Rinzai school from a moribund period of stagnation, refocusing it on its traditionally rigorous training methods integrating meditation and koan practice. Hakuin’s influence was such that all Rinzai Zen masters today trace their lineage through him (and thus through the Ōtōkan lineage), and all modern practitioners of Rinzai Zen use practices directly derived from his teachings.”
.
Artemis:  I’ve posted Three Blind Men Struggling to Cross a Log Bridge (HERE) but wanted this version with the next post.
 

Above:  Hakuin Ekaku, 1685-1768, Two Blind Men on a Bridge. Ink on paper, 11 x 33 in. Man’yo-an Collection, Japan Society, NY

.

Both the health of our bodies
and the fleeting world outside us
are like the blind men’s
round log bridge – a mind/heart
that can cross over is the best guide

~Hakuin Ekaku

.

From Wiki:  “Hakuin Ekaku (白隠 慧鶴, January 19, 1686 - January 18, 1768) was one of the most influential figures in Japanese Zen Buddhism. He revived the Rinzai school from a moribund period of stagnation, refocusing it on its traditionally rigorous training methods integrating meditation and koan practice. Hakuin’s influence was such that all Rinzai Zen masters today trace their lineage through him (and thus through the Ōtōkan lineage), and all modern practitioners of Rinzai Zen use practices directly derived from his teachings.”

.

Artemis:  I’ve posted Three Blind Men Struggling to Cross a Log Bridge (HERE) but wanted this version with the next post.

 

.
Great works of art in all cultures succeed in capturing within the constraints of their form both the pathos of anguish and a vision of its resolution. Take, for example, the languorous sentences of Proust or the haiku of Basho, the late quartets and sonatas of Beethoven, the tragicomic brushwork of Sengai or the daunting canvases of Rothko, the luminous self-portraits of Rembrandt and Hakuin. Such works achieve their resolution not through consoling or romantic images whereby anguish is transcended. They accept anguish without being overwhelmed by it. They reveal anguish as that which gives beauty its dignity and depth.

.
~Stephen Batchelor (Buddhism without Beliefs)  
Image:  No. 4, 1964, National Gallery of Art, Mark Rothko

.

Great works of art in all cultures succeed in capturing within the constraints of their form both the pathos of anguish and a vision of its resolution. Take, for example, the languorous sentences of Proust or the haiku of Basho, the late quartets and sonatas of Beethoven, the tragicomic brushwork of Sengai or the daunting canvases of Rothko, the luminous self-portraits of Rembrandt and Hakuin. Such works achieve their resolution not through consoling or romantic images whereby anguish is transcended. They accept anguish without being overwhelmed by it. They reveal anguish as that which gives beauty its dignity and depth.

.

~Stephen Batchelor (Buddhism without Beliefs)  

Image:  No. 4, 1964, National Gallery of Art, Mark Rothko

He allowed himself to be swayed by his conviction that human beings are not born once and for all on the day their mothers give birth to them, but that life obliges them over and over again to give birth to themselves. 

.
~Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez, 6 March 1927 – 17 April 2014
Photographer:Graciela Iturbide, gracielaiturbide.org    - The Writer Gabriel García Márquez, México, 1992 (via: quemarropa.net) 
Artemis:  Thank you patriciadamiano for the name of the photographer .  :)  

He allowed himself to be swayed by his conviction that human beings are not born once and for all on the day their mothers give birth to them, but that life obliges them over and over again to give birth to themselves. 

.

~Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez, 6 March 1927 – 17 April 2014

Photographer:Graciela Iturbide, gracielaiturbide.org    - The Writer Gabriel García Márquez, México, 1992 (via: quemarropa.net) 

Artemis:  Thank you patriciadamiano for the name of the photographer .  :)