Vu Cao Dam ( Vietnam  | France, 1908-2000)

Bio from askart.com:  ”Painter and sculptor Vu Cao Dam was born in Hanoi in 1908. He attended the Ece des Beaux Arts de Indochine between 1926 and 1931. In 1932 he obtained a scholarship to further his studies as a sculptor in France. Eventually he specialized in painting. His painting during this period was mainly on silk, and showed the influence of ancient Chinese art.”

Vu Cao Dam ( Vietnam  | France, 1908-2000)



Bio from askart.com:  ”Painter and sculptor Vu Cao Dam was born in Hanoi in 1908. He attended the Ece des Beaux Arts de Indochine between 1926 and 1931. In 1932 he obtained a scholarship to further his studies as a sculptor in France. Eventually he specialized in painting. His painting during this period was mainly on silk, and showed the influence of ancient Chinese art.”


The Conversation, 1944
Vu Cao Dam  (Vietnam  | France, 1908-2000)

The Conversation, 1944

Vu Cao Dam  (Vietnam  | France, 1908-2000)


Vu Cao Dam ( Vietnam  | France, 1908-2000)

Vu Cao Dam ( Vietnam  | France, 1908-2000)


Divinite, 1969
Vu Cao Dam (Vietnam  | France, 1908-2000)

Divinite, 1969

Vu Cao Dam (Vietnam  | France, 1908-2000)


Divinite, 1970
Vu Cao Dam ( Vietnam  | France, 1908-2000)

Divinite, 1970

Vu Cao Dam ( Vietnam  | France, 1908-2000)


Flower Duet from the opera Lakmé by  Léo Delibes


I want the audio on my player.  

 


Flower Duet from Lakmé - Léo Delibes
performed by Milica Ilic (soprano), Victoria Lambourn (mezzo soprano), Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra conducted by Andrew Greene

From Wiki:  ”The Flower Duet” (French: Duo des fleurs / Sous le dôme épais) is a famous duet for sopranos from Léo Delibes’ opera Lakmé, first performed in Paris in 1883. The duet takes place in act 1 of the three-act opera, between characters Lakmé, the daughter of a Brahmin priest, and her servant Mallika, as they go to gather flowers by a river”

Lyrics

Lakmé: Dôme épais le jasmin
Mallika: Sous le dôme épais où le blanc jasmin

L.: À la rose s’assemble,
M.: À la rose s’assemble,

L.: Rive en fleurs, frais matin,
M.: Sur la rive en fleurs, riant au matin,

L.: Nous appellent ensemble.
M.: Viens, descendons ensemble.

L.: Ah! glissons en suivant
M.: Doucement glissons; De son flot charmant

L.: Le courant fuyant;
M.: Suivons le courant fuyant;

L.: Dans l’onde frémissante,
M.: Dans l’onde frémissante,

L.: D’une main nonchalante,
M.: D’une main nonchalante,

L.: Gagnons le bord,
M.: Viens, gagnons le bord

L.: Où l’oiseau chante,
M.: Où la source dort.

L.: l’oiseau, l’oiseau chante.
M.: Et l’oiseau, l’oiseau chante.

L.: Dôme épais, blanc jasmin,
M.: Sous le dôme épais, Sous le blanc jasmin,

L.: Nous appellent ensemble!
M.: Ah! descendons ensemble!

L.: Mais, je ne sais quelle crainte subite
 s’empare de moi.
 Quand mon père va seul à leur ville maudite,
 Je tremble, je tremble d’effroi!

M.: Pour que le Dieu Ganeça le protège,
 Jusqu’à l’étang où s’ébattent joyeux
 Les cygnes aux ailes de neige,
 Allons cueillir les lotus bleus.

L.: Oui, pres des cygnes aux ailes de neige,
 Allons cueillir les lotus bleus.

L: Dôme épais le jasmin
M: Sous le dôme épais où le blanc jasmin

L.: Nous appellent ensemble!
M.: Ah! descendons ensemble!



English Translation



Thick dome of jasmine
Under the dense canopy where the white jasmine,

Blends with the rose,
That blends with the rose,

Bank in bloom, fresh morning,
On the flowering bank, laughing in the morning,

Call us together.
Come, let us drift down together.

Ah! Let’s glide along
Let us gently glide along; For its enchanting flow

The fleeing current;
Let us follow the fleeing current;

On the rippling surface,
On the rippling surface,

With a nonchalant hand,
With a nonchalant hand,

Let’s go to the shore,
Come, let’s go to the shore

Where the bird sings,
Where the spring sleeps.

the bird, the bird sings.
And the bird, the bird sings.

Thick dome, white jasmine,
Under the dense canopy, Under the white jasmine,

Call us together!
Ah! Let’s drift down together!

But, an eerie feeling of distress
overcomes me.
When my father goes into their damned city
I tremble, I tremble with fright!

In order for him to be protected by Ganesh
To the pond where joyfully play
The snow-winged swans
Let us pick blue lotuses.

Yes, near the swans with wings of snow,
And pick blue lotuses.

Thick dome of jasmine
Under the dense canopy where the white jasmine,

Together call us!
Ah! Let’s drift down together!


Previous post on the Opera:  HERE


artemisdreaming:

Thank you all for making me a part of your dash… your day and for the inspiration and support.  :)



Claude MonetFrench, 1840-1926
Branch of the Seine near Giverny (Mist), from the series “Mornings on the Seine”, 1897  artic.edu



See archive for more:  HERE
Claude Monet
French, 1840-1926
Branch of the Seine near Giverny (Mist), from the series “Mornings on the Seine”, 1897  artic.edu

See archive for more:  HERE
Claude Monet
French, 1840-1926
Water Lilies, 1906
Oil on canvas
89.9 x 94.1 cm (35 3/8 x 37 1/16 in.)
Inscribed at lower right: Claude Monet 1906
Mr. and Mrs. Martin A. Ryerson Collection, 1933.1157 Art Institute of Chicago



Description from The Art Institute of Chicago   “One instant, one aspect of nature contains it all,” said Claude Monet, referring to his late masterpieces, the water landscapes that he produced at his home in Giverny between 1897 and his death in 1926. These works replaced the varied contemporary subjects he had painted from the 1870s through the 1890s with a single, timeless motif—water lilies. The focal point of these paintings was the artist’s beloved flower garden, which featured a water garden and a smaller pond spanned by a Japanese footbridge. In his first water-lily series (1897–99), Monet painted the pond environment, with its water lilies, bridge, and trees neatly divided by a fixed horizon. Over time, the artist became less and less concerned with conventional pictorial space. By the time he painted Water Lilies, which comes from his third group of these works, he had dispensed with the horizon line altogether. In this spatially ambiguous canvas, the artist looked down, focusing solely on the surface of the pond, with its cluster of plants floating amidst the reflection of sky and trees. Monet thus created the image of a horizontal surface on a vertical one. Four years later, he further transcended the conventional boundaries of easel painting and began to make immense, unified compositions whose complex and densely painted surfaces seem to merge with the water. — Entry, Essential Guide, 2009, p. 232.”


See archive for more:  HERE

Claude Monet

French, 1840-1926

Water Lilies, 1906

Oil on canvas

89.9 x 94.1 cm (35 3/8 x 37 1/16 in.)

Inscribed at lower right: Claude Monet 1906

Mr. and Mrs. Martin A. Ryerson Collection, 1933.1157 Art Institute of Chicago


Description from The Art Institute of Chicago   “One instant, one aspect of nature contains it all,” said Claude Monet, referring to his late masterpieces, the water landscapes that he produced at his home in Giverny between 1897 and his death in 1926. These works replaced the varied contemporary subjects he had painted from the 1870s through the 1890s with a single, timeless motif—water lilies. The focal point of these paintings was the artist’s beloved flower garden, which featured a water garden and a smaller pond spanned by a Japanese footbridge. In his first water-lily series (1897–99), Monet painted the pond environment, with its water lilies, bridge, and trees neatly divided by a fixed horizon. Over time, the artist became less and less concerned with conventional pictorial space. By the time he painted Water Lilies, which comes from his third group of these works, he had dispensed with the horizon line altogether. In this spatially ambiguous canvas, the artist looked down, focusing solely on the surface of the pond, with its cluster of plants floating amidst the reflection of sky and trees. Monet thus created the image of a horizontal surface on a vertical one. Four years later, he further transcended the conventional boundaries of easel painting and began to make immense, unified compositions whose complex and densely painted surfaces seem to merge with the water. — Entry, Essential Guide, 2009, p. 232.”

See archive for more:  HERE


Summer
Edmund Dulac  
British 1882 - 1953 (via: Sotheby’s)

Summer

Edmund Dulac  

British 1882 - 1953 (via: Sotheby’s)


artemisdreaming:

Yvette Depaepe  HERE  

Click to view in lightbox


Jarek Puczel

Jarek Puczel


worclip:

The Drinkable Book

Concept design for Water is Life

Chemist: Dr Theresa Dankovich
Biochemical Engineer: Corinne Clinch

Chief Creative Officer: Matt Eastwood
Executive Creative Director: Menno Kluin
Group Creative Director: Andrew McKechnie
Head of Design: Juan Carlos Pagan
Associate Creative Director: Sam Shepherd
Associate Creative Director: Frank Cartagena
Senior Designer: Brian Gartside
Designer: Aaron Stephenson

The Drinkable Book is a life saving tool that filters water and teaches proper sanitation & hygiene to those in the developing world. 


Each book is printed on technologically advanced filter paper, capable of killing deadly waterborne diseases. And each page is coated with silver nanoparticles, whose ions actively kill diseases like cholera, typhoid and E. coli. 

Once water is passed through the filter, bacteria count is reduced by over 99.99%, making the filtered water comparable to tap water in the United States of America.

The paper costs only pennies to produce, making it by far the cheapest option on the market. Each filter is capable of giving someone up to 30 days worth of clean water. And each book is capable of providing someone with clean water for up to 4 years.

Laura Youngblood, widow of U.S. Navy Petty Officer Travis L. Youngblood, touches his gravestone while visiting his grave in Section 60 of Arlington National Cemetery during the Memorial Day weekend in Arlington, Virginia, May 24, 2009. Youngblood died of wounds received in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in July of 2005 in Iraq. (REUTERS/Larry Downing) #   via:  boston.com  HERE


Anti war.  Pro soldier.  

Laura Youngblood, widow of U.S. Navy Petty Officer Travis L. Youngblood, touches his gravestone while visiting his grave in Section 60 of Arlington National Cemetery during the Memorial Day weekend in Arlington, Virginia, May 24, 2009. Youngblood died of wounds received in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in July of 2005 in Iraq. (REUTERS/Larry Downing) #   via:  boston.com  HERE

Anti war.  Pro soldier.