Copper alloy hollow cast statue of the princess-priestess Takushit.

From namuseum.gr:  ”Lacking its base into which it was set by means of two attachments, which are rectangular in cross-section, placed on the soles of the feet.
The statue was found in 1880, in Lower Egypt, on the hill of Kom-Toruga, near Lake Mariut, south of Alexandria. Late Period, end of 25th Dynasty, ca. 670 BC. It had ritual, votive, and funerary functions. The statue is depicted striding soundly with its two feet; the left foot is forward in a walking stance, indicative of movement and energy. The left arm is bent under the chest and most likely held a hieratic scepter. The right arm, extended closely against the body, held the menit (musical instrument and necklace). The scepter and the menit make clear her priestly status and her high social position and were the symbol par excellence of priests from the higher social classes. The long, diaphanous robe, which is decorated all over with incised patterns that were filled with precious metal wires (technique of damasking), accentuates the beautifully shaped, sensuous body. The decoration is divided into fine horizontal bands, which alternate with four thinner strips at the midsection, the pelvis, the thighs, and the knees. The first band, which covers the torso, is wider. The bands are decorated with representations of divinities from the Northeastern area of the Nile Delta (the homeland of Takushit), while the strips are filled with hieroglyphs that communicate prayers to the said divinities. Her name means “the Ethiopian” and possibly refers to a family connection to or a marriage with an Ethiopian. According to the inscriptions that the statue bears, her father was Akan II, the Great Chief of the Libyan tribe Ma, and her office was of priestess “waab” (pure-chaste priestess), which according to the religious hierarchy was the lowest priestly title.  The use of the statue was ceremonial while the priestess was alive, and was part of the ritual equipment of the sanctuary, in which there was a priestess. After her death, it was used for votive and funerary ends and it decorated her tomb, which, according to the custom of the time, is located within the sanctuary precinct.”  via:  namuseum.gr

                                                         

Copper alloy hollow cast statue of the princess-priestess Takushit.

From namuseum.gr:  ”Lacking its base into which it was set by means of two attachments, which are rectangular in cross-section, placed on the soles of the feet.

The statue was found in 1880, in Lower Egypt, on the hill of Kom-Toruga, near Lake Mariut, south of Alexandria. Late Period, end of 25th Dynasty, ca. 670 BC. It had ritual, votive, and funerary functions.

The statue is depicted striding soundly with its two feet; the left foot is forward in a walking stance, indicative of movement and energy. The left arm is bent under the chest and most likely held a hieratic scepter. The right arm, extended closely against the body, held the menit (musical instrument and necklace). The scepter and the menit make clear her priestly status and her high social position and were the symbol par excellence of priests from the higher social classes. The long, diaphanous robe, which is decorated all over with incised patterns that were filled with precious metal wires (technique of damasking), accentuates the beautifully shaped, sensuous body. The decoration is divided into fine horizontal bands, which alternate with four thinner strips at the midsection, the pelvis, the thighs, and the knees. The first band, which covers the torso, is wider. The bands are decorated with representations of divinities from the Northeastern area of the Nile Delta (the homeland of Takushit), while the strips are filled with hieroglyphs that communicate prayers to the said divinities.

Her name means “the Ethiopian” and possibly refers to a family connection to or a marriage with an Ethiopian. According to the inscriptions that the statue bears, her father was Akan II, the Great Chief of the Libyan tribe Ma, and her office was of priestess “waab” (pure-chaste priestess), which according to the religious hierarchy was the lowest priestly title.

The use of the statue was ceremonial while the priestess was alive, and was part of the ritual equipment of the sanctuary, in which there was a priestess. After her death, it was used for votive and funerary ends and it decorated her tomb, which, according to the custom of the time, is located within the sanctuary precinct.”  via:  namuseum.gr

Girl on a Swing
Everett Shinn 


From Wiki:  ”Everett Shinn (November 6, 1876 – May 1, 1953) was an American realist painter and member of the Ashcan School. He also exhibited with the short-lived group known as “The Eight,” who protested the restrictive exhibition policies of the powerful, conservative National Academy of Design. He is best known for his robust paintings of urban life in New York and London, a hallmark of Ashcan art, and for his theater and residential murals and interior-design projects. His style varied considerably over the years, from gritty and realistic to decorative and rococo.”

Girl on a Swing

Everett Shinn 


From Wiki:  ”Everett Shinn (November 6, 1876 – May 1, 1953) was an American realist painter and member of the Ashcan School. He also exhibited with the short-lived group known as “The Eight,” who protested the restrictive exhibition policies of the powerful, conservative National Academy of Design. He is best known for his robust paintings of urban life in New York and London, a hallmark of Ashcan art, and for his theater and residential murals and interior-design projects. His style varied considerably over the years, from gritty and realistic to decorative and rococo.”


Back Row, Follies Bergere, 1900
Everett Shinn

Back Row, Follies Bergere, 1900

Everett Shinn

Fifth Avenue, 1910
Everett Shinn

Fifth Avenue, 1910

Everett Shinn

Window Shopping, 1905, Private Collection
Everett Shinn

Window Shopping, 1905, Private Collection

Everett Shinn

The White Ballet, 1904,  Smithsonian
Everett Shinn

The White Ballet, 1904,  Smithsonian

Everett Shinn

Keith’s Union Square, Brooklyn Museum
Everett Shinn

Keith’s Union Square, Brooklyn Museum

Everett Shinn

Girl on Stage, 1906
Everett Shinn

Girl on Stage, 1906

Everett Shinn

Easter, 1902
Everett Shinn

Easter, 1902

Everett Shinn

Theatre Box, 1906
Everett Shinn

Theatre Box, 1906

Everett Shinn

Untitled (Window Pane with View of City Yard)
Artist: Consuelo Kanaga, American, 1894-1978 
Medium: Gelatin silver photograph
Dates: 1930s or 1940s
Accession Number: 82.65.239
Credit Line: Gift of Wallace B. Putnam from the estate of Consuelo Kanaga, Brooklyn Museum
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Untitled (Window Pane with View of City Yard)

Artist: Consuelo Kanaga, American, 1894-1978 

Medium: Gelatin silver photograph

Dates: 1930s or 1940s

Accession Number: 82.65.239

Credit Line: Gift of Wallace B. Putnam from the estate of Consuelo Kanaga, Brooklyn Museum

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La Déchirure,1981
Henri Cadiou  (via: saintgeorgesdedidonne.com)
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La Déchirure,1981

Henri Cadiou  (via: saintgeorgesdedidonne.com)

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Nature - B&W  

Nara Simhan  HERE

View in photobox for descriptions.  Queue

nihongogogo:

2e7c8b09

ずるい zurui sly, sneaky, cunning

5d33f186

猫ガンダム neko gandamu Neko Gundam

22dc49ba

肉球nikukyuu paw pads

60b09164

ぴょんぴょん pyon pyon hop, skip (onomatopoeia)

77dff70f

不自然 fushizen unnatural

366d7db0

撫でる naderu to pat

609f66a8

戦かう tatakau wage a war; to fight or battle

790eaa73

飛び上がる 



Artemis:   >^..^<     LOL

Arthur Rimbaud Documentary  (via: youtube |  MU51CB0X)

Slide show of images from the life and travels of poet Arthur Rimbaud. Images of 19th century Charleville, Paris, the Commune, France, London, Belgium and many photographs of Aden and Harar taken by Rimbaud himself. Infamous manuscripts in Rimbaud’s handwriting; biographical drawings by Delahaye and friends. Poetry read by Joan Baez has been grafted onto music to help create an impression of the places, faces and scenes which Rimbaud knew and would recognize.