The inner life has its soft and gentle beauty; an abstract formlessness as well as a subtle charm. I often consider myself as a figure in a foggy painting: faltering lines, insecure distances, and a merging of greys and blacks. An emotion or a mood, a mere wisp of color, is shaded off and made to spread until it becomes one with all that surrounds it. 

~Virginia Woolf
Image: chapel veil by °Kristamas is haunted on Flickr (via: pinterest | ChloeSakurai) 

The inner life has its soft and gentle beauty; an abstract formlessness as well as a subtle charm. I often consider myself as a figure in a foggy painting: faltering lines, insecure distances, and a merging of greys and blacks. An emotion or a mood, a mere wisp of color, is shaded off and made to spread until it becomes one with all that surrounds it.

~Virginia Woolf

Image: chapel veil by °Kristamas is haunted on Flickr (via: pinterest | ChloeSakurai) 

Charlie Chaplin playing the cello in 1915 (via: fanpop)

Charlie Chaplin playing the cello in 1915 (via: fanpop)

Present and Absent series, 1990
John Batho

Present and Absent series, 1990

John Batho

Present and Absent series, 1990
John Batho

Present and Absent series, 1990

John Batho

Jugend
Jane Atché 
.

Jane Atché   1872-1937 French, b. Toulouse
Bio via metropostcard.com:  ”Atché was a printer painter who was a close associate of Alphonse Mucha, and worked in a strong Art Nouveau Style. She created posters for Job cigarette paper, which wound up as illustrations on postcards.”


                       

Jugend

Jane Atché 

.

Jane Atché   1872-1937 
French, b. Toulouse

Bio via metropostcard.com:  ”Atché was a printer painter who was a close associate of Alphonse Mucha, and worked in a strong Art Nouveau Style. She created posters for Job cigarette paper, which wound up as illustrations on postcards.”

                       

Mistletoe and Holly: decorative panels, 1899

Jane Atché (1872-1937)

Jane Atché (1872-1837)

Jane Atché (1872-1837)

Jane Atché (1872-1837)

Jane Atché (1872-1837)



I am the immense shadow of my tears.

~Federico García Lorca

I am the immense shadow of my tears.

~Federico García Lorca



The artist, and particularly the poet, is always an anarchist in the best sense of the word. He must heed only the call that arises within him from three strong voices: the voice of death, with all its foreboding, the voice of love and the voice of art.

~Federico García Lorca
Image:  lclhuerta.wordpress

The artist, and particularly the poet, is always an anarchist in the best sense of the word. He must heed only the call that arises within him from three strong voices: the voice of death, with all its foreboding, the voice of love and the voice of art.

~Federico García Lorca

Image:  lclhuerta.wordpress

Three Girls, 1881-82, Private Collection 
Winslow Homer
See archive for more Winslow Homer:  HERE
Q

Three Girls, 1881-82, Private Collection 

Winslow Homer

See archive for more Winslow Homer:  HERE

Q

The House of Parliament, 1881
Winslow Homer
See archive for more Winslow Homer:  HERE
Q

The House of Parliament, 1881

Winslow Homer

See archive for more Winslow Homer:  HERE

Q

Two Men in a Canoe study, 1895, Portland Museum of Art
Winslow Homer

See archive for more Winslow Homer:  HERE

Two Men in a Canoe study, 1895, Portland Museum of Art

Winslow Homer

See archive for more Winslow Homer:  HERE

10 Things Your Dog Would Tell You..
My life is likely to last 10 to 15 years. Any separation from you will be painful: remember that before you get me.
Give me time to understand what you want of me.
Place your trust in me- it is crucial to my well being.
Do not be angry at me for long, and do not lock me up as punishment.
You have your work, your entertainment,and your friends. I only have you.
Talk to me sometimes. Even if I don’t understands your words, I understand your voice when it is speaking to me.
Be aware that how ever you treat me, I will never forget.
Remember before you hit me that I have teeth that could easily hurt you, but I choose not to bite you because I love you.
Before you scold me for being uncooperative, obstinate, or lazy, ask yourself if something might be bothering me. Perhaps I might not be getting the right food, or I have been out too long, or my heart is getting too old and weak.
Take care of me when I get old; you too will grow old. Go with me on difficult journeys. Never say: “I cannot bear to watch” or “Let it happen in my absence.” Everything is easier for me if you are there, even my death.
:((

10 Things Your Dog Would Tell You..

  1. My life is likely to last 10 to 15 years. Any separation from you will be painful: remember that before you get me.
  2. Give me time to understand what you want of me.
  3. Place your trust in me- it is crucial to my well being.
  4. Do not be angry at me for long, and do not lock me up as punishment.
  5. You have your work, your entertainment,and your friends. I only have you.
  6. Talk to me sometimes. Even if I don’t understands your words, I understand your voice when it is speaking to me.
  7. Be aware that how ever you treat me, I will never forget.
  8. Remember before you hit me that I have teeth that could easily hurt you, but I choose not to bite you because I love you.
  9. Before you scold me for being uncooperative, obstinate, or lazy, ask yourself if something might be bothering me. Perhaps I might not be getting the right food, or I have been out too long, or my heart is getting too old and weak.
  10. Take care of me when I get old; you too will grow old. Go with me on difficult journeys. Never say: “I cannot bear to watch” or “Let it happen in my absence.” Everything is easier for me if you are there, even my death.




:((

Parian marble. Roman copy of the 2nd cent. CE after a bronze Greek original by Myron of the mid-5th cent. BCE.
Inv. No. 56039.
Rome, Roman National Museum, Palazzo Massimo alle Terme.
Origin: From Castelporziano, the ancient Porcigliano, Villa Reale; found in the ruins of a villa of the beginning of the Imperial period in 1906.
Description: 
Fragmentary Discobolus.

From Castelporziano, the ancient Porcigliano, Villa Reale; found in the ruins of a villa of the beginning of the Imperial period.

The statue, headless and missing its lower legs, right arm and the fingers of the left hand, is composed of fourteen fragments and shows the traces of an old restoration in plaster in several places (on the left thigh, the palm-trunk support and the base).

Parian marble.

Ht. 148 cm (with the base); inv. 56039.


"As with the Lancellotti Discobolus, this statue depicts the culminating moment of action just before the throw. The athlete, whose body is thrown forward in a movement of violent rotation, concentrates his weight onto his right leg; of the missing pieces, the corresponding arm, which carried the discus, was stretched out behind, and the left arm inscribed a deep arc grazing the right knee. There are several divergences from the Lancellotti Discobolus, which allow one to speak of a “version,” rather than a faithful replica, of the original generally attributed to Myron. The left shoulder is closer to the ground and the torso more strongly twisted towards the spectator, elements which confer a greater three-dimensionality compared to the Lancellotti Discobolus and which have been interpreted by Fuchs as modifications posterior to the age of Myron and reprised in the Augustan period, when the statue was executed. This proposed date is consistent with its provenance; the statue in fact comes from a villa built in the Augustan period and reconstructed circa AD 140. On the other hand, D. Candilio, following previous studies, maintains the date in the Hadrianic period. In the Baths of Vedius in Ephesus, a complex of the mid-second century AD, a copy of the Discobolus was fortuitously found which formed part of a larger sculptural group alluding to the imperial cult; this discovery has prompted Manderscheid to formulate the suggestive hypothesis that the placement of statues inside Roman thermae (usually in the palestrae) represented an element of the Hellenic paideia in a structure which for the Romans represented the ideal continuation of the Greek gymnasium."  Brunella Germini
Literature: W. Fuchs, Die Skulptur der Griechen, München, 1969, p. 176 ff., no. 2269;  Museo Nazionale Romano, Le sculture, A. Giuliano ed., I, 1 (Roma, 1979), p. 180, no. 117 (D. Candilio);  H. Manderscheid, Die Sculpturenausstattung der kaiserzeitlichen Thermenanlagen, Berlin, 1981, p. 43 ff.
Credits: © 2006. Photo: S. Sosnovskiy. ancientrome.com.  Text: museum inscription to the sculpture.  © 2005 г. Description: Museo Nazionale Romano. PALAZZO MASSIMO ALLE TERME. English Edition. Edited by Adriano La Regina. ELECTA, 2005 (First Edition 1998), p. 132. 

Parian marble. Roman copy of the 2nd cent. CE after a bronze Greek original by Myron of the mid-5th cent. BCE.

Inv. No. 56039.

Rome, Roman National Museum, Palazzo Massimo alle Terme.

Origin: From Castelporziano, the ancient Porcigliano, Villa Reale; found in the ruins of a villa of the beginning of the Imperial period in 1906.

Description:

Fragmentary Discobolus.

From Castelporziano, the ancient Porcigliano, Villa Reale; found in the ruins of a villa of the beginning of the Imperial period.

The statue, headless and missing its lower legs, right arm and the fingers of the left hand, is composed of fourteen fragments and shows the traces of an old restoration in plaster in several places (on the left thigh, the palm-trunk support and the base).

Parian marble.

Ht. 148 cm (with the base); inv. 56039.

"As with the Lancellotti Discobolus, this statue depicts the culminating moment of action just before the throw. The athlete, whose body is thrown forward in a movement of violent rotation, concentrates his weight onto his right leg; of the missing pieces, the corresponding arm, which carried the discus, was stretched out behind, and the left arm inscribed a deep arc grazing the right knee. There are several divergences from the Lancellotti Discobolus, which allow one to speak of a “version,” rather than a faithful replica, of the original generally attributed to Myron. The left shoulder is closer to the ground and the torso more strongly twisted towards the spectator, elements which confer a greater three-dimensionality compared to the Lancellotti Discobolus and which have been interpreted by Fuchs as modifications posterior to the age of Myron and reprised in the Augustan period, when the statue was executed. This proposed date is consistent with its provenance; the statue in fact comes from a villa built in the Augustan period and reconstructed circa AD 140. On the other hand, D. Candilio, following previous studies, maintains the date in the Hadrianic period. In the Baths of Vedius in Ephesus, a complex of the mid-second century AD, a copy of the Discobolus was fortuitously found which formed part of a larger sculptural group alluding to the imperial cult; this discovery has prompted Manderscheid to formulate the suggestive hypothesis that the placement of statues inside Roman thermae (usually in the palestrae) represented an element of the Hellenic paideia in a structure which for the Romans represented the ideal continuation of the Greek gymnasium."  Brunella Germini

Literature: W. Fuchs, Die Skulptur der Griechen, München, 1969, p. 176 ff., no. 2269;  Museo Nazionale Romano, Le sculture, A. Giuliano ed., I, 1 (Roma, 1979), p. 180, no. 117 (D. Candilio);  H. Manderscheid, Die Sculpturenausstattung der kaiserzeitlichen Thermenanlagen, Berlin, 1981, p. 43 ff.

Credits: © 2006. Photo: S. Sosnovskiy. ancientrome.com.  Text: museum inscription to the sculpture.  © 2005 г. Description: Museo Nazionale Romano. PALAZZO MASSIMO ALLE TERME. English Edition. Edited by Adriano La Regina. ELECTA, 2005 (First Edition 1998), p. 132.