William Shakespeare by Pablo Picasso  :D

William Shakespeare by Pablo Picasso  :D

When, in disgrace with Fortune and men’s eyes,
I all alone beweep my outcast state,
And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries,
And look upon myself and curse my fate,
Wishing me like to one more rich in hope,
Featured like him, like him with friends possessed,
Desiring this man’s art, and that man’s scope,
With what I most enjoy contented least,
Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising,
Haply I think on thee, and then my state,
Like to the lark at break of day arising
From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven’s gate

For thy sweet love remembered such wealth brings,
That then I scorn to change my state with kings.

“
William Shakespeare, Sonnet 29
Portrait of Cosimo I Medici, 1537
Angelo Bronzino
Detail


             

Portrait of Cosimo I Medici, 1537

Angelo Bronzino

Detail

             

Bookstores  :)

  1. Shakespeare and Co, Paris
  2. Livraría Lello,  Porto, Portugal
  3. Livraría Lello
  4. Livraría Lello
  5. El Ateneo, Buenos Aires, Argentina, former theatre converted to bookstore
  6. El Ateneo, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  7. Selexyz-Dominicanen, Maastricht,  Netherlands, a former 13th century Dominican church
  8. Selexyz-Dominicanen
  9. Selexyz-Dominicanen
  10. Le Bal des Ardents, Lyon, France

Artemis:  See Panoramic photo of Selexyz-Dominicanen: HERE

Monday pm queue

Selexyz-Dominicanen, Maastricht, Netherlands: Dominican Bookstore, Maastricht - Panoramic photo by Steve Vogel

Description from: 360cities.net “Dating back to the 13th century, the structure was a Dominican church until Maastricht was invaded by Napoleon in 1794. Since then, it has been briefly used as a parish, then a warehouse, city archive, but it was also used for car shows, parking bicycles, flower exhibitions, and boxing matches and finally made over into a bookstore.

Led by architecture firm Merkx + Girod, the new installations are highlighted by a towering, three-story black steel book stack stretching up to the stone vaults. The highest shelves are reachable by lift or by a set of stairs within the sleek, well-made stack. At the back of the church customers and visitors can sit and admire the beautifully renovated 14th century ceiling frescoes, or chat over a cup of coffee in the café situated in the former choir. The design has won the Lensvelt de Architect Interior Prize, and in 2008 The Guardian called it the “best bookstore in the world”. HERE

Artemis:  Use full screen.  :) 

See Bookstore post: HERE

Monday pm queue


 

Avalokiteshvara, China, Tangut State of Xi -Xia, Khara-Khoto, 13th century State Russian Museum
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From Wiki:  “Avalokiteśvara (Sanskrit: अवलोकितेश्वर lit. “Lord who looks down”) is a bodhisattva who embodies the compassion of all Buddhas. Portrayed in different cultures as either male or female, Avalokiteśvara is one of the more widely revered bodhisattvas in mainstream Mahayana Buddhism, as well as unofficially in Theravada Buddhism.
The original name for this bodhisattva was Avalokitasvara. The Chinese name for Avalokiteśvara is Guānshìyīn Púsà (觀世音菩薩), which is a translation of the earlier name “Avalokitasvara Bodhisattva.” This bodhisattva is variably depicted as male or female, and may also be referred to simply as Guānyīn.
In Sanskrit, Avalokitesvara is also referred to as Padmapāni (“Holder of the Lotus”) or Lokeśvara (“Lord of the World”). In Tibetan, Avalokiteśvara is known as Chenrezig, སྤྱན་རས་གཟིགས་ (Wylie: spyan ras gzigs) and is said to be incarnated as the Dalai Lama, the Karmapa and other high lamas.”
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Avalokiteshvara, China, Tangut State of Xi -Xia, Khara-Khoto, 13th century State Russian Museum

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From Wiki:  “Avalokiteśvara (Sanskrit: अवलोकितेश्वर lit. “Lord who looks down”) is a bodhisattva who embodies the compassion of all Buddhas. Portrayed in different cultures as either male or female, Avalokiteśvara is one of the more widely revered bodhisattvas in mainstream Mahayana Buddhism, as well as unofficially in Theravada Buddhism.

The original name for this bodhisattva was Avalokitasvara. The Chinese name for Avalokiteśvara is Guānshìyīn Púsà (觀世音菩薩), which is a translation of the earlier name “Avalokitasvara Bodhisattva.” This bodhisattva is variably depicted as male or female, and may also be referred to simply as Guānyīn.

In Sanskrit, Avalokitesvara is also referred to as Padmapāni (“Holder of the Lotus”) or Lokeśvara (“Lord of the World”). In Tibetan, Avalokiteśvara is known as Chenrezig, སྤྱན་རས་གཟིགས་ (Wylie: spyan ras gzigs) and is said to be incarnated as the Dalai Lama, the Karmapa and other high lamas.”

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Avalokiteshvara, China, Tangut State of Xi -Xia, Khara-Khoto, 12-13th century, State Russian Museum
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From lashtal.com: “The exact origin of the religious practices relating to Avalokitesvara is unclear. Some Western scholars have suggested that the concept of Avalokitesvra, along with many other supernatural beings in Buddhism, was based on a Hindu deity absorbed by Mahayana teaching as an aspect of the historical Buddha Shakyamuni. The word avalokita means “seeing or gazing down” and īśvara means “lord” in Sanskrit. Īśvara is also an alternate name for the Hindu god Shiva, who seems to also have acted as an inspiration for some of Avalokitesvara’s depictions in art.   According to Mahayana doctrine, Avalokitesvara was a person who has made a great vow to listen to the prayers of all sentient beings in times of difficulty, and to postpone his own Buddhahood until he has helped every being on Earth achieve enlightenment. Sutras associated with Avalokitesvara include the Lotus Sutra, particularly the 25th chapter, which is sometimes referred to as the Avalokitesvara Sutra, and the Heart Sutra. 
Avalokitesvara (known as Chenrezig in Tibetan) is an important deity in Tibetan Buddhism. In particular, the Dalai Lama is held to be a manifestation of Avalokitesvara.   Other manifestations popular in Tibet include Sahasra-bhuja (a form with a thousand arms) and Ekādaśamukha (a form with eleven faces).
In Tibetan Buddhism, White Tara acts as the consort and energizer of Avalokitesvara. According to popular belief, Tara came into existence from a tear of Avalokitesvara. When the tear fell to the ground, it created a lake, and a lotus opening in the lake revealed Tara. Another version of this tale tells that Tara emerged from the heart of Avalokitesvara. In both, it is Avalokitesvara’s outpouring of compassion which manifests Tara as a being.
Tibetan Buddhism relates Avalokitesvara to the six-syllable mantra Om Mani Padme Hum, also spelled Om Mani Peme Hung and Om Mani Padme Hon. It is for this reason that Avalokitesvara is also called Shadakshari, Lord of the Six Syllables
In the Tibetan tradition, Avalokitesvara is seen as arising from two sources. One is the relative source, where in a previous kalpa (era), a devoted, compassionate Buddhist monk became a Bodhisattva, thus giving the present kalpa its form of Avalokitesvara. That is not in conflict, however, with the ultimate source view, which is Avalokitesvara as the universal manifestation of compassion. In brief, it may be said that the Bodhisattva is the anthropomorphised vehicle for the actual deity, serving to bring about a better understanding of Avalokitesvara to humankind.”  via: lashtal.com
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Avalokiteshvara, China, Tangut State of Xi -Xia, Khara-Khoto, 12-13th century, State Russian Museum

.

From lashtal.com: “The exact origin of the religious practices relating to Avalokitesvara is unclear. Some Western scholars have suggested that the concept of Avalokitesvra, along with many other supernatural beings in Buddhism, was based on a Hindu deity absorbed by Mahayana teaching as an aspect of the historical Buddha Shakyamuni. The word avalokita means “seeing or gazing down” and īśvara means “lord” in Sanskrit. Īśvara is also an alternate name for the Hindu god Shiva, who seems to also have acted as an inspiration for some of Avalokitesvara’s depictions in art.   According to Mahayana doctrine, Avalokitesvara was a person who has made a great vow to listen to the prayers of all sentient beings in times of difficulty, and to postpone his own Buddhahood until he has helped every being on Earth achieve enlightenment. Sutras associated with Avalokitesvara include the Lotus Sutra, particularly the 25th chapter, which is sometimes referred to as the Avalokitesvara Sutra, and the Heart Sutra. 

Avalokitesvara (known as Chenrezig in Tibetan) is an important deity in Tibetan Buddhism. In particular, the Dalai Lama is held to be a manifestation of Avalokitesvara.   Other manifestations popular in Tibet include Sahasra-bhuja (a form with a thousand arms) and Ekādaśamukha (a form with eleven faces).

In Tibetan Buddhism, White Tara acts as the consort and energizer of Avalokitesvara. According to popular belief, Tara came into existence from a tear of Avalokitesvara. When the tear fell to the ground, it created a lake, and a lotus opening in the lake revealed Tara. Another version of this tale tells that Tara emerged from the heart of Avalokitesvara. In both, it is Avalokitesvara’s outpouring of compassion which manifests Tara as a being.

Tibetan Buddhism relates Avalokitesvara to the six-syllable mantra Om Mani Padme Hum, also spelled Om Mani Peme Hung and Om Mani Padme Hon. It is for this reason that Avalokitesvara is also called Shadakshari, Lord of the Six Syllables

In the Tibetan tradition, Avalokitesvara is seen as arising from two sources. One is the relative source, where in a previous kalpa (era), a devoted, compassionate Buddhist monk became a Bodhisattva, thus giving the present kalpa its form of Avalokitesvara. That is not in conflict, however, with the ultimate source view, which is Avalokitesvara as the universal manifestation of compassion. In brief, it may be said that the Bodhisattva is the anthropomorphised vehicle for the actual deity, serving to bring about a better understanding of Avalokitesvara to humankind.”  via: lashtal.com

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Madonna and Child, 1550, Minneapolis Institute of Art, 
Putnam Dana McMillan Fund, Accession Number: 69.4
Cornelis van Cleve
Detail
              
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                                    Virgin and Child, 1550,  Fitzwilliam Museum
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From Wiki:  “Cornelis (Sotte Cleef) van Cleve (or van Cleef ), 1520, in Anvers - 1567 was a Netherlandish painter.  He was the son of Joos van Cleve.”   

Madonna and Child, 1550, Minneapolis Institute of Art, 

Putnam Dana McMillan Fund, Accession Number: 69.4

Cornelis van Cleve

Detail

              image

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                                    image

                                    Virgin and Child, 1550,  Fitzwilliam Museum

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From Wiki:  “Cornelis (Sotte Cleef) van Cleve (or van Cleef ), 1520, in Anvers - 1567 was a Netherlandish painter.  He was the son of Joos van Cleve.”   

Be silent or let thy words be worth more than silence.
“
Pythagoras  
Feel
Loui Jover
Sunday Queue

Feel

Loui Jover

Sunday Queue

Metropolitain  
Loui Jover

Metropolitain  

Loui Jover

Boy and Cello
Loui Jover

Boy and Cello

Loui Jover

Loui Jover

Loui Jover

Dove  
Loui Jover

Dove  

Loui Jover

Harmony  
Loui Jover
Sunday Queue

Harmony  

Loui Jover

Sunday Queue